Science & Technology


CC0 PUBLIC DOMAIN
There are flu clinics for students at the Peabody and Homewood campuses.

Take preventative measures to avoid the flu this season

September 12, 2019

With flu season almost upon us, one of the best forms of defense is to learn how to recognize and prevent the flu. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), symptoms of the flu typically include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headaches, fatigue and in some cases vomiting and diarrhea. 


Public domain
Trump announced the launch of the U.S. Space Command in August.

Trump's new Space Command launches

September 5, 2019

This year there has been renewed public interest in the topic of space exploration and development. On Aug. 29, U.S. President Donald Trump announced the launch of the U.S. Space Command. 


Courtesy of Veena Das
Professor Veena Das is a professor and scholar of Indian anthropology.

Social Science Spotlight: Professor Veena Das

September 12, 2019

It is difficult to neatly pigeonhole Veena Das’ research endeavors. A Kreiger-Eisenhower Professor of Anthropology, Das is a scholar of Indian anthropology, the anthropology of violence and social suffering and ways of producing knowledge.


BME team’s novel product will make at-home dialysis safer for patients with kidney failure.

BME student team creates device to make at-home dialysis safer

May 2, 2019

Of the 660,000 Americans receiving treatment for kidney failure, 468,000 are undergoing dialysis. Now a team of engineers at Hopkins have developed a device that reduces the risk of infection in at-home dialysis. Their work will make it even more efficient for patients to perform dialysis at their own convenience. 


Senior Woodrow Wilson Fellows present their original research

May 2, 2019

Senior Woodrow Wilson Fellows presented their independent research projects to the Hopkins community on Thursday, April 25. The Woodrow Wilson Fellowship Program provides undergraduates with financial support and faculty mentoring on research over the course of three or four years. Students apply to the program as incoming students or rising sophomores by submitting a project proposal and they work on their projects during the entirety of their Hopkins careers.

Senior Woodrow Wilson fellows shared their original research projects with attendees.

When shown images of faces, children passed character judgements.

Research shows children also judge on facial features

May 2, 2019

If a child you just met is not particularly nice to you, it may not be your fault. A recent psychological study from the American Psychological Association has provided evidence that young children tend to make snap character judgments based on physical features, showing that a judgmental nature may be more inherent in humans than previously believed. 


Hopkins holds sustainability hackathon

May 2, 2019

GreenHacks hosted the first sustainability hackathon at Hopkins on April 20. The hackathon was held at FastForward U, a collaborative space dedicated to empowering student entrepreneurs across disciplines. 


Mickey Sloat presents her research at TriBeta poster session.

TriBeta poster session features student research

May 2, 2019

Effective communication is one of the hallmarks of scientific research. In light of this, the Rho Psi chapter of the Beta Beta Beta (TriBeta) National Biological Honor Society hosted a poster session on Friday. Students majoring in Molecular and Cellular Biology at Hopkins had the opportunity to present their research to their peers.


PUBLIC DOMAIN
CRISPR targets and removes or replaces pieces of genetic material.

CRISPR system could be the future of gene editing

April 25, 2019

Researchers at Cornell University recently developed a novel CRISPR system that has the potential to affect human genes. This research was featured in the paper “Introducing a Spectrum of Long-Range Genomic Deletions in Human Embryonic Stem Cells Using Type I CRISPR-Cas” published in the journal Molecular Cell. The development may, in the future, be able to recognize and destroy viruses such as Epstein-Barr and hepatitis B.  


Nobel Prize Winner discuses medical diplomacy

April 25, 2019

The Osler Medical Symposium held their last event of the semester on Tuesday, hosting Dr. Peter Agre and Dr. Sheri Lewis. Agre is the recipient of the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor. Lewis is the manager of the Global Disease Surveillance Program at the Applied Physics Laboratory. 

Courtesy of Laura Wadsten
Sheri Lewis and Peter Agre discuss their experiences in medical diplomacy for Osler Medical Symposium.

Genetic tests like 23andMe and Ancestry may not accurately predict diseases

April 25, 2019

It has long been known that some diseases are genetically inherited.  For example, sickle cell anemia is caused by a single mutation at a specific point in a gene responsible for hemoglobin. Having two copies of this mutated gene guarantees the disease. However, the relationship between one’s genes and disease is not always direct. 

CC BY 0
The accuracy of genetic tests like 23andMe are under scrutiny.