Science & Technology


Male reproductive organs can develop in females

February 13, 2019

Scientists have recently discovered male reproductive organs on a female insect. This finding demonstrates the significant role that evolution plays in developing male and female genitalia and also challenges the concept of sex – what it means to be ...

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Barklice is one of the species in which females can possess male sex organs.

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CATCH is a new method that can detect viruses in low abundance.

Computational method detects epidemic viruses

February 6, 2019

To this day, many people still recall the widespread Zika outbreak in the wake of 2016 that caught the majority of South and North America off guard. In November 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the end of the epidemic after many months of struggle. 


Static electricity may soon help power your iPhone

April 11, 2019

Though many of us experience it every day, static electricity remains somewhat poorly understood. Researchers have recently begun to look into the details behind how electricity is generated through frictional contact; that is, the molecular physics behind your hair’s propensity to stick to balloons. The research being conducted at the University of Buffalo and Kansas State University has so far uncovered some interesting twists to the electron exchange known as triboelectrification that takes place between two materials in contact with one another.


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Many animal species, such as the pygmy-owl, will be affected by the proposed border wall extension. 

Building a border wall would put wildlife at risk

February 6, 2019

Although the controversy over whether or not to extend the 650-mile border wall between the United States and Mexico largely centers around immigration, it is also important to consider the effects a wall would have on the environment of the borderlands.


NASA lost contact with its Mars Opportunity rover in a dust storm

February 6, 2019

Mars is one of the closest planets to Earth within our solar system and a strong contender for habitability under controlled conditions. Considering its unique status, it makes sense that many missions have been launched for the purpose of characterizing the planet. This would allow astronomers and scientists to better understand Mars and determine whether life could possibly exist there in the future. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Mars Opportunity rover is one of two rovers launched back in 2003 to probe Mars for any signs of past life.

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NASA’s Opportunity rover might have to end its 15-year orbit on Mars.

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The ratio of male to female births may be affected by temperature.

Global warming might mean fewer baby boys

February 6, 2019

One unexpected impact of climate change may be an altered ratio of male to female children born, a recent study suggests. Research published by a team of Japanese and Danish scientists in Fertility and Sterility indicated that there is a statistically significant relationship between temperature differentials and the male-to-female birth ratio. 


Autophagy naturally destroys cancerous cells

February 6, 2019

Cancer research is constantly ongoing with new discoveries left and right and a potential breakthrough scattered here and there. Scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, San Diego, Calif., have recently discovered a process that may potentially put an end to the controversial topic on the role of autophagy in cancer. 

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Scientists are ever closer to the cure for cancer after the discovery that autophagy fights cancer.

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The WHO attributed the drastic increase of measles to the growing number of anti-vaxxers.

Superbugs and anti-vaxxers threaten global health

January 30, 2019

The World Health Organization’s (WHO) list of 10 global health threats may surprise some this year, with uninformed parents and germs straight out of a science fiction novel making the cut. Diseases that were previously pushed to the brink of eradication are making a comeback, thanks in part to the anti-vaccination movement. 


New test detects Alzheimer’s before symptoms show

January 30, 2019

According to a recent study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases in Germany, a blood test might be able to reliably detect signs of brain damage in a person who is on the way to developing Alzheimer’s disease. This simple blood test can provide results even before the person begins showing hallmark symptoms of the disease, such as confusion and memory loss.

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A recently developed blood test might help detect certain neurological diseases before symptom onset.

Virtual reality fails to stimulate real responses

January 31, 2019

Many people might recall an experience where simply looking at an image of someone yawning triggers them to yawn. This is no magic; in fact, it is a popular phenomenon known as contagious yawning. Studies in the past have shown that approximately 50 percent of adults would yawn in response to other people’s yawning.


Blood vessels in petri dish help diabetes research

January 30, 2019

Scientists at the University of British Columbia have recently made a breakthrough in diabetes research. For the first time, researchers were able to grow human blood vessels as organoids in a petri dish, which will dramatically enhance research in cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes.


Global warming causes shorter, colder winters

January 30, 2019

Chicago natives are no stranger to arctic weather, suffering through subzero temperatures at least once a year. But this winter, temperatures are plummeting to near negative 55 degrees Fahrenheit with wind chill, making Chicago colder than even the South Pole. And the reason may be surprising: global warming.


 
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Blue Water Baltimore focuses on cleaning up the Harbor and streams.

Blue Water Baltimore’s Jenn Aiosa reflects on career

January 31, 2019

According to predictions from the Baltimore Office of Sustainability, Baltimore will encounter severe public health, infrastructural and economic issues as a result of global warming, from expanding rates of respiratory problems to extreme flooding. 


Quadriplegics wirelessly control computer systems

December 6, 2018

Paralysis is a debilitating condition, but one that affects nearly two percent of the population in the U.S. — approximately 5.4 million people. Many paralyzed patients suffer from quadriplegia, a condition signified by partial or complete lack of motor function in all four limbs. Often the result of a traumatic injury, paralysis is caused by an inability of the spinal cord to pass signals from the brain to the peripheral nervous system.

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BrainGate researchers have previously developed prosthetic limbs that react to neural signals.

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HopAI brings disciplines together to talk about the importance of AI.

HopAI launches with its first symposium at Hopkins

December 12, 2018

HopAI held its inaugural event on Thursday, Nov. 29. The organization, which seeks to connect and expose Hopkins students to artificial intelligence (AI), invited three speakers from different areas of study to describe their work with the diverse technologies.


Ionic wind can be used to power small planes

December 6, 2018

Propellers and turbines may soon be obsolete when it comes to powering airplanes: new research suggests that in the future, a sustainable new method of powering aircraft may replace current jet engines and propulsion techniques.