Published by the Students of Johns Hopkins since 1896
October 7, 2022

Opinion

The opinions presented below are solely the views of the author and do not represent the views of The News-Letter. If you are a member of the Hopkins community looking to submit a piece or a letter to the editor, please email opinions@jhunewsletter.com.



SOLEN FEYISSA / CC BY 2.0
Boppana worries TikTok is pushing users’ political views to the extreme ends of the spectrum.

TikTok is bad for political discourse and furthers polarization

Social media is increasingly influencing political discourse, and TikTok is no exception, becoming home to political content for its 1 billion monthly users. However TikTok’s structure, algorithm and moderation are inherently hostile to productive political discussions and instead encourage extremism.



NIAID / CC-BY-2.0
Zacharski raises concerns about the University’s current approach to the monkeypox virus.

The University should do more to prevent monkeypox

Last month, many students began what was their first day of the “normal” college experience: attending classes in 400-person lecture halls, grabbing food with large groups of friends and walking around campus unmasked. The months of wondering “Will this ever end?” seemed to be over as the first fully in-person semester since the fall of 2019 commenced. 


SHOURYA ARASHANAPALLI / DESIGN STAFF

The grind should stop sometimes. Go on a Brody detox.

Welcome to Week Four of the semester — classes are underway, midterms are right around the corner and life just got a whole lot busier.  While high grades are a top priority for any student, especially here at Hopkins, we also want to emphasize the importance of maintaining your mental health and well-being.


Richter details the unjustified belittlement of nurses.

“Just a nurse”: The devaluation of the nursing profession is undeserved

“I am just a nurse.”  These are the words my professors had me swear by oath to never speak during my first day of nursing school. I have never uttered these words because I have never believed them. I’ve always respected the nursing profession and, in general, disagree entirely with devaluing a much-needed component of a functioning society. 


FILE PHOTO
Raj questions the University’s decision to relax COVID mitigation policies.

Hopkins COVID-19 policies aren’t doing enough

Over the past couple of years, Hopkins has been at the forefront of tracking COVID-19 cases and disseminating accurate information about the virus to the public. Now that in-person classes are back, it can be tempting to believe the pandemic has ended. Unfortunately that is not the case.


Don’t get cocky, Blue Jays. Rank is just a number.

The recently released 2022-2023 U.S. News & World Report college rankings place Hopkins at seventh among national universities — a jump from last year’s ninth. The annual rankings always spark conversation around campus. Over the last decade, Hopkins has gradually climbed to the top 10 and is continuing to rise through the ranks.


McCormick argues that Tate’s recent virality reflects a much longer history of misogyny on the internet.

Andrew Tate's 15 minutes of fame are a classic portrait of modern online misogyny

I hardly need to introduce Andrew Tate. The controversy surrounding his name is difficult to miss. The 35-year-old former kickboxer, who gained notoriety through streaming and social media platforms, is known for saying atrocious things such as “I’m not a f**king rapist, but I like the idea of just being able to do what I want” while explaining why he moved to Romania and that women must “bear some responsibility” for being sexually assaulted. 


It’s time to be real, Hopkins. COVID is still here.

Every new school year brings change: different professors, different classmates, maybe even a different go-to order at Brody Cafe. But some of the recent changes on campus have us scratching our heads, wondering how and why the University has decided to alter key policies.


EVA RINALDI/CC BY 2.0
Kye criticizes Swift’s inconsistent political activism.

The problem with Taylor Swift’s political activism

Taylor Swift’s place in the political sphere is complicated, to say the least. Early in her career, she stayed silent about politics. Swift has said that she acted this way for two main reasons: she believed that country music was hostile towards artists who spoke out politically, as was the case with the Dixie Chicks, and she did not feel educated enough to make political statements with the ability to influence millions of people. 


Oh, the places we’ll go: Looking forward to fall 2022

This fall marks the University’s first fully in-person semester in three years. Along with this change comes the revival of classic college traditions and the process of adjusting to a repopulated campus. It’s both an exciting and scary time for all of us, even the ones who have been at Hopkins for a few years now.







SHOURYA ARASHANAPALLI / DESIGN STAFF

We’re back on campus, but students still aren’t voting.

Amid last year’s virtual classes, the 2021 Student Government Association (SGA) election showed a 66% decrease in voter turnout compared to the year prior. While this is understandable given that we were virtual, only 20.3% of students — compared to last year’s 12% — participated in the recent SGA election even now that we’re back on campus. 




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