Published by the Students of Johns Hopkins since 1896
September 18, 2021

Magazine



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Whether you're interested in journalism, photography or business, Editors-in-Chief Leela Gebo and Laura Wadsten encourage you to join The News-Letter.

Why we joined The News-Letter and why YOU should, too!

When I moved into AMR III on a balmy August day, I knew a couple things: 1) I had no clue what I wanted to do with my life and 2) I was ready to take advantage of all things Hopkins. I applied early decision way back in 2017 (I’m feeling old), essentially hoping Johns Hopkins himself would throw a “life plan” right in front of my face. That came true, kind of. 


COURTESY OF THE UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES — SHERIDAN LIBRARIES 
The News-Letter has been a staple of University life for 125 years.

Finding our niche at The News-Letter

After logging out of my Zoom class last November, my phone rang with an email notification. To my surprise, it was a reply to an interview request I had sent the day prior to a person I never thought would actually respond.  I have some time before 11am. Here’s my number:


COURTESY OF CLAYTON BLICK
The Gatehouse, pictured above in the 1970s, has housed student journalism at Hopkins for decades.

Putting student journalism in the spotlight

Over the course of the pandemic, The News-Letter transitioned from a weekly, print publication to a daily, online-only production. As shocking as it was for us to see the Gatehouse sit empty for nearly a year, the digital transformation of our production process matched current trends of news consumption — as of 2020, 86% of Americans reported that they accessed news from their smartphones. 


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Make sure to catch an Orioles game at Camden Yards before this year's season ends.

From Babb Field to Camden Yards: making the most of Baltimore sports

With the fall semester about to kick off, Hopkins students are slowly making their way back to campus. As the University begins to open up, the sports industry is beginning to open up as well. Many stadiums and leagues are permitting fans to return to games, which brings a whole other dimension to watching a sport.


COURTESY OF BRODY SILVA
Whether you're craving American, Lebanese, Japanese or anywhere in between, Baltimore has plenty of options.

A taste of Baltimore: Where to eat in Charm City

Moving to a new city presents the opportunity to explore a brand-new culinary landscape. Other than national trends, much of the identity of a city’s food culture is characteristic of its economic history, immigration patterns and community bonding through food. Though it can be daunting to find all the best places to take friends to show your local know-how, hopefully this guide gives you an updated look at what’s good and what’s special (all for a night out under $15).


A peek at the Class of 2025

Artists and athletes, scientists and scholars, hailing from across the world and just around the corner, the members of the Class of 2025 are bringing plenty of interesting perspectives to Hopkins. Here is a quick introduction to some of the new faces you might see around campus this fall.


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Lipkin argues that, when picking your major, it does not matter how good you are at a subject.

What you should look for in your major

I stumbled upon my Mathematics major in a manner only describable as an accident. I had always taken hard math classes in high school, and I became accustomed to math taking up most of my time, so it just seemed natural that I would continue to take those classes in college. And it sort of never stopped. Even though I am, by most accounts, terrible at mathematics.


COURTESY OF CLAIRE GOUDREAU
While living alone for the first time can be daunting, it can also offer independence.

How to live alone for the first time

They annoyed you on the car ride to school with their music choices, fumigated your dorm down with Lysol and possibly cried while they hugged you goodbye. But now that your parents have gone home, what are you to do with no adult supervision? The realization that an actual grown-up is not in the next room to help with an unexpected crisis is a scary one, but it’s one that most every freshman is facing right now.


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While “The Beach” has no sand or waves, students still use it to hang out with friends and sunbathe.

Your guide to need-to-know Hopkins slang

Now that you’ve arrived at Hopkins, there is a lot you need to take in all at once. It is certainly overwhelming, especially when people are throwing around lingo and jargon that might as well be in a different language. Here are the explanations behind some of the most common Hopkins lingo to help you get the hang of things.


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Students can call the Johns Hopkins COVID-19 Call Center if they have any questions or concerns about the virus.

A checklist of Hopkins COVID-19 protocols

Dear Class of ‘25, Congratulations on getting into Hopkins! We are so excited to finally resume a sense of normalcy this coming school year and welcome you on campus. However, with cases on the rise and new variants spreading, the fight against COVID-19 is not over. Here is a checklist of a few important University rules (as of Aug. 23) to keep in mind to best PROTECT JHU as everyone returns and begins a new year in-person:


COURTESY OF BJARKE INGELS GROUP
Construction on the new student center should be finished by fall 2024.

The 2021 campus news catch-up

Over the past year, The News-Letter’s News & Features section has published approximately 250 articles. Even for Hopkins, that’s a lot of homework if you want to get caught up on campus current events.


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From harbor nightlife to neighborhood shopping and strolls, there are plenty of ways to get off campus and explore Baltimore.

Getting more out of Baltimore

It can be difficult to explore outside your college campus whilst managing a busy schedule. But it is possible to find time to spend with friends outside of the tight confinements of the Hopkins campus. Every year, at least one senior will tell you something along the lines of “don’t get stuck in the Hopkins bubble.” But what does this even mean?


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Where’s your favorite place to go in Baltimore?

“Hampden! It's got all the best shops — think Charmery, Hunting Ground, The Food Market. Plus, it has great memories for me: late-night ice cream runs, first tattoo, shopping trips... It’s one of Baltimore’s many charms.”  -Lillian Kim, English and Writing Seminars


COURTESY OF RUDY MALCOM

What was the best class you took at Hopkins?

“Structure of the Nervous System, because Dr. Hendry is an absolute legend and an amazing teacher who really cares about his students.”  -Nicholas Malloy, Neuroscience


COURTESY OF OLIVIA BROWN

What advice do you have for next year’s incoming freshmen?

“You will get to where you need to be in your own time! Don't compare yourself with others, which is often easier said than done as Hopkins students love to keep busy and get involved in many clubs. But rather accept where you are and realize you are at Hopkins for a reason.” -Angel Zhao, History and International Studies


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What’s your favorite memory at Hopkins?

“Rushing from class to class, or midnight sessions at Brody. Basically everyone stressing together in unity.”  -Shizheng "JJ" Tie, Environmental Health and Engineering


COURTESY OF KATY WILNER
Wilner, pictured here with other graduating editors of The News-Letter, spent much of her undergraduate experience working for the paper.

How Hopkins has changed since freshman year

There were moments this year that seemed to go on forever,  from the last couple minutes of a two-hour Zoom class to waiting for my advisor to triple-check that I would graduate on time to the brief lag between texts with my parents after asking them to reread my graduate school acceptance letter to ensure I wasn’t misinterpreting the offer.


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The policy changes represent the far-reaching impacts of the recent variant-driven spike in COVID-19 cases.

An outgoing senior's advice to incoming freshmen

The summer before my freshman year, I combed the internet trying to find ways to have an unforgettable college experience (why not? I only got one chance). I wanted one simple recipe: Do X, then do Y, but make sure you maintain Z. I talked to my friends’ older siblings to hear what they had to say, but they were all very different: One loved their ballet group and another enjoyed their research in antiferromagnetism. 


COURTESY OF LAUREN PAULET
Despite her senior year being almost entirely virtual, Paulet still made valuable memories.

Making the most of senior year during quarantine

I remember the very first day of move-in like it was yesterday. After two days of driving across the country, my family and I pulled up to the large marble sign that read “Wolman Hall.” It was exactly 7:00 a.m., and the Gilman clock tower rang just as we unloaded the car. 


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