Published by the Students of Johns Hopkins since 1896
February 25, 2021

News & Features





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Because Hopkins is a private school, it is not legally bound by the First Amendment. 

FIRE calls on Hopkins to better protect students' free speech

This month, the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) targeted Hopkins as its Speech Code of the Month. FIRE is a non-profit organization dedicated to protecting university students’ free speech rights on campus. Every month, the organization selects a specific policy that it believes violates the First Amendment and encourages the respective university to make reforms.


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There had been 520 students already admitted as part of the ED I cycle.

Hopkins admits 304 ED II applicants

“It’s definitely a nice Valentine’s gift because I’m used to rejection on Valentine's Day,” said Jackson Morris, who was recently admitted to the Class of 2025. 


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The Hopkins Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps, which was established in 1916, is the oldest program of its kind in the nation.

U.S. Army officers explore role of the military

The Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF) Agora Institute hosted a student forum titled “Closing the Civilian-Military Divide” on Feb. 10. During the event, panelists discussed misconceptions about the U.S. military with Hopkins students. 



COURTESY OF THE FOREIGN AFFAIRS SYMPOSIUM
Because this year’s symposium will be entirely virtual, the group hopes that events will be more accessible to students and community members.

Foreign Affairs Symposium announces virtual 2021 lineup

The Foreign Affairs Symposium (FAS) announced today that the theme of its 2021 symposium will be “Where Do We Go From Here?” The lineup features activist Angela Davis, Yemeni human rights defender Radhya Al-Mutawakel, Democracy Now! host Amy Goodman, rapper Noname and experts on the Uyghur Crisis.



COURTESY OF CHRIS H. PARK
The Committee to Establish Principles on Naming plans to create its guidelines by the end of the semester. 

University begins deliberation to establish renaming guidelines

The University announced it would form the Committee to Establish Principles on Naming last July as part of its Diversity and Inclusion initiative. The committee is charged with developing guidelines for the process of renaming and de-naming titles affiliated with Hopkins buildings, scholarships and programs, including names that may be tied to racism or inequality.





COURTESY OF HOPKINS EMERGENCY RESPONSE ORGANIZATION
HERO EMTs demonstrated their mass casualty incident drills to University President Ronald J. Daniels in spring 2019.

HERO resumes operations for the spring semester

After pausing its operations during the fall semester, the Hopkins Emergency Response Organization (HERO) resumed activities for the spring on Feb. 2. HERO is the University’s student-run, professional emergency medical services organization. It operates as a 24/7 response service, with the Hopkins Emergency Response Unit branch tasked with providing patient care. 





COURTESY OF CHRIS H. PARK 
Hopkins remains committed to increasing sustainability measures in its dining practices.

Bon voyage, Bon Appétit: Hopkins dining will be self-operated in 2022

Under the new model, the University plans to renovate its dining facilities, standardize meal plans across the two campuses and incorporate campus cafes into dining plans. Two new dining areas will also be constructed in the renovated Rec Center and the to-be constructed Stavros Niarchos Foundation Agora Institute building.


COURTESY OF CHRIS H. PARK 
The Milton S. Eisenhower Library, which opened for the first time this year on Tuesday, Feb. 2, is now closed through Friday, Feb. 5. 

University bans all gatherings until Monday as COVID-19 outbreak worsens

The University updated its previous announcement about the recent COVID-19 outbreak on campus in an email on Thursday, Feb. 4. According to the email, 58 students have now tested positive for the virus — a drastic increase from the 38 known cases recorded on Wednesday. Last week, only seven students tested positive. 


COURTESY CHRIS H. PARK
Hopkins began providing transportation to the warehouse storing student belongings in January.

Housing continues reimbursement process for lost belongings

Last March, the University abruptly shut down in-person activities in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, giving students two days to vacate their dorms. Students were later allowed to return to campus to pick up their belongings. Hopkins hired professional movers to pack the dorms of those who did not return. 


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