Published by the Students of Johns Hopkins since 1896
October 19, 2021

Science & Technology



COURTESY OF LAURA WADSTEN 
Semenza and colleagues researched the way cells sense oxygen, and how they function in low oxygen conditions, or hypoxia.

Professor Semenza wins Nobel Prize in Medicine for work on HIF

Early Monday morning, the Nobel Assembly announced that Dr. Gregg L. Semenza, the C. Michael Armstrong Professor of Pediatrics at Hopkins School of Medicine, was a 2019 recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Semenza received this honor alongside Dr. William G. Kaelin of Harvard and Dr. Peter J. Ratcliffe of Oxford. Kaelin completed his specialist training in Internal Medicine and Oncology at Hopkins.



Professors talk ethics of gene editing and Gattaca

We begin in the not too distant future, where perfection has pervaded the genome itself, elevating individuals into what seems like the best version of themselves. Children are edited to be brilliant, healthy and beautiful — as genetically ideal as possible. This is the world of Gattaca, a science fiction cult classic that remains significant in today’s bioethical conversations about genetic research. 


New study uses ferrets to model higher-level vision

A recent study by Hopkins researchers revealed that ferrets are well-suited for higher-level vision research. This was discovered in light of their performance when faced with behavioral tests that assessed the motion and form integration capacity of adult ferrets.



COURTESY OF LAURA WADSTEN
Students work on the HEMI inspired grain puzzle in MSE Library’s Q-level.

MICA students present their HEMI-inspired projects

A collaboration between the Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute (HEMI) and the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) facilitates a fusion of engineering and art, in the hopes that it will produce new perspectives to address innovative subjects. Researchers at HEMI study materials under extreme conditions, such as intense heat, strong magnetic fields and explosions and design structures that could withstand those conditions.



COURTESY OF TANVI NARVEKAR
Students learned about different environmental groups on campus.

Student groups organize Sustainable Boba Bash

The Hopkins Student Organization for Programming (HOP) hosted Sustainable Boba Bash in the Mattin Center Courtyard on Friday. Students were invited to enjoy boba tea with a reusable metal straw while learning about different environmental causes.


Freshmen: Please explore non-pre-med options

Dear Freshmen,  You are now familiar enough with Hopkins to realize that we are literally in the land of pre-meds. You know what I’m talking about. They’re not rare; they live among us — they’re in our classes, they live in our buildings and they surround us at office hours. In fact, many of you reading this probably are one or thought about becoming one — those brave souls who are choosing to take the road less taken — to spend nearly a decade of early adulthood in school and take on one of the most admired professions out there.




EDA INCEKARA / PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR
The Goucher and the Cohen Mummies are displayed at the Archaeological Museum.

Archaeological Museum images ancient mummies

Stepping into the Hopkins Archaeological Museum, located in the heart of Gilman Hall, your eyes are sure to settle on two individuals: the Goucher Mummy and the Cohen Mummy. How can we understand the identity and humanity of these two ancient women? Beginning in 2016 and completed in 2018, Who Am I? Remembering the Dead Through Facial Reconstruction is an exhibition that aims to answer this question, telling the story of two ancient Egyptian mummies through scientific imaging technologies.


MSE exhibit showcases extreme materials as art

A new installation on display at Hopkins challenges the boundary between science and art. Jenna Frye, the creator of the exhibit Symmetry and Fracture, is a full-time faculty member at the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) and artist in residence at the Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute (HEMI). 


 COURTESY OF CYNTHIA MOSS
The ‘Bat Lab’ studies how sensory information guides flight navigation.

Lab Spotlight: “Bat Lab” studies bat echolocation

Cynthia Moss is a Hopkins professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, with joint appointments in Neuroscience and Mechanical Engineering. Her research is centralized in a place fondly known as the “Bat Lab,” where she aims to better understand how bat brains interpret the world around them using echolocation. 


Professor Calder studies capitalism and Islam

Broadly, Ryan Calder, an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology, researches the relationship between religion and capitalism.  “For much of the history of human civilization, for the many people who considered themselves religious — their religious beliefs have affected the way they act in markets,” he said. “Some sociologists, very famous ones, believed in the 19th and 20th centuries that as economies modernize, religion should play less and less of a role in economic activity.” 


Trump proposes a ban on flavored e-cigarettes

The Trump administration’s proposal to ban the sale of flavored e-cigarette products has once again put the issue of tobacco use back in the spotlight. The announcement followed reports of a vaping-related illness that has affected more than 400 people around the country. 



The U.S. President is a science and tech influencer

The American President isn’t usually the first person that comes to mind when you think of major influencers in the scientific community. Yet, the nature of the position means that they actually have a lot of impact on various areas within the STEM field, including the environment, funding for research and space exploration. To really understand what a president can do to science and tech, we must look to the past.


MED panel discusses ethics of gene editing

The student organization Medical Ethics Discussion Panel (MED Panel) held a discussion about the ethics of gene editing on Monday. The discussion is the first in a series of monthly events organized by MED Panel. 


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