Published by the Students of Johns Hopkins since 1896
August 9, 2022

Magazine



COURTESY OF MUHAMMAD ABIDI
Abidi discusses the lessons he has learned while planning to graduate in three years.

Graduating early amid a pandemic

How do you feel about graduating? I have been asked this question almost every day for the past couple weeks leading up to graduation on May 22. To be entirely honest, I am not quite sure how I feel. As someone who is graduating early after three years, with COVID-19 sending me home for almost a year and a half in the middle, I have certainly not had the “traditional” college experience.


COURTESY OF ALINA PANNONE
Pannone and her friends share their favorite places in Baltimore.

Favorite places in Baltimore from '22 grads

For many of us, Baltimore might not have been the first city that came to mind when we envisioned our college life. But after spending four years here, I've grown to appreciate the city and its hidden gems. So, without further ado, here is a list of places in Baltimore that have become favorites for my friends and I:


COURTESY OF ELIZABETH IM
Im discusses her changing mindset in regards to college as she prepares to graduate.

My ever-changing impression of college

My impression of “college” was a place that determined who you would be, perhaps permanently. This idea haunted me, because I had repeatedly been told that I needed to obtain a certain level of college education in order to start my life right. If not, well, maybe that was it for me. 


COURTESY OF NEHA SANGANA
Sangana reflects on learning to enjoy time with herself and to explore Baltimore on her own.

A year of bike rides through Baltimore

I think it’s fair to say that everyone lost their minds during quarantine in different ways and dealt with it in different ways. Me? You guessed it — I developed an addiction to lazy bike rides in the Texas sun through my suburban neighborhood.


COURTESY OF ANDRE VU
Vu discusses the tumultuous path to college as a first-born, first generation student.

On being the firstborn and first in college

College was neither a guarantee nor an expectation. It was my only resort. College was a word passed around my community like a looming icon of the mythical “American Dream” — a dream of social mobility, wealth and generational prosperity. My parents fled from their homes, as their families were torn apart along ideological lines, to a foreign land with the hope for a better future: a future of prosperity for their children. 


COURTESY OF HANNA SUH
Hanna Suh and Adyant Balaji list the top things to do at Hopkins before graduation.

22 Hopkins things to do before you graduate from ‘22 grads

While this list compiles a few events and activities that (as the title suggests) must be experienced during your time at Hopkins, it is most enjoyable when they are done completely by accident. We encourage you to spontaneously do random things as well and create your own list. If you find yourself wandering through campus and hear commotion and noise from Arellano Theater, approach it. And always say yes to free food — you’ll find yourself staying for the event. 


COURTESY OF REBECCA MURATORE
Muratore reminisces on her time at The News-Letter.

Saying goodbye to The News-Letter

Like many freshmen, when I first got to Hopkins I had no idea what I was going to do with my time here. Pacing through the aisles at my first Student Involvement Fair (SIF) and putting my name down for any club that sounded vaguely interesting, I cast a net as wide as I could. Most of those frantic, overeager freshman sign-ups amounted to little more than receiving monthly emails from clubs I never ended up attending. The News-Letter, however, sent the one club email I actually paid attention to.


COURTESY OF RIA ARORA
Arora reflects on her first year post-graduation.

When we all graduate, where do we go?

Hi Class of 2022,  It’s the most wonderful time of the year: graduation season! With perfectly manicured pictures of your cap and gown, a flurry of “Congrats Grad!” balloons and bottles of champagne, graduation season is (and should be) a time of merriment and joy, celebrating all the hard work you’ve put in for the past four years. 



COURTESY OF ANANTA SRIVASTAVA
Srivastava shares some advice and life lessons for her freshman self.

Letter to my freshman self

Dear freshman self, You made it. As cliche as that may sound, I know that wasn’t something you could have easily imagined, especially after your first semester. You are graduating today and are about to begin a new, exciting chapter of your life. These past four years have flown by faster than you could have imagined, and it has definitely been a learning experience. I’m going to do my best to share what I wish I had known when I was in your place. 


COURTESY OF MEGHANA RAVI
Ravi discusses how her love for science and creative writing have intertwined to shape her experiences and goals.

Pursuing the intersection of science and the humanities

Growing up, I got the impression that people expected me to eventually choose between studying the humanities and science. However, I’ve always felt an equally strong affinity for both. Even in my undergraduate days, which are coming to a close now, I decided to major in both Writing Seminars and Molecular and Cellular Biology (MCB), because I couldn’t imagine not having either discipline as a part of my life.


WOLFGANG LONIEN/CC BY-SA 2.0

Park reflects on the computer games she played growing up.

A breakdown of the top gaming websites of the 2000s

As one of the founding members of Gen Z, I was lucky enough to experience firsthand the descent into our current, modern-day internet frenzy. From binging the music videos of iconic Disney superstar Ashley Tisdale to learning how to poke my friends on Facebook, I was a seasoned internet user by the age of 10. 


COURTESY OF LEELA GEBO
Leela on her first day of kindergarten.

Growing up in Brooklyn

My childhood is chronicled by the first-day-of-school photos taken on the stoop of the apartment building I grew up in. Though my backpacks, hair and outfits change over the years, the limestone columns and wrought-iron door remain constant behind me. 



COURTESY OF LAURA WADSTEN
Wadsten spent countless hours hanging out on the rooftop terrace of Mattin Center.

Back in my day

Since I first stepped on campus in 2018, lots has changed (obviously). For the sake of prosperity — and so I can reminisce in pre-pandemic nostalgia — I racked my brain for some places, policies and things that just aren’t what they used to be. For better and worse (mainly better), this school is a different place than it was four years ago. 


COURTESY OF ROSIE JANG
Michelle reflects on how early digital technology shaped her childhood.

A look back at early 2000s technology

In today’s society, it is difficult to imagine a world without technology. From iPhones to laptops to artificial intelligence, technology is central to every part of our lives and only continues to advance every year.


COURTESY OF ISABEL THOMAS
Thomas describes the toys that defined different eras of her life.

Toy trends from my childhood

Growing up, I enjoyed a lot of old-school games that my elementary and middle school-age cousins — and actually, most of my friends today — have never heard of. Some of these were handclap games like Concentration 64 and Miss Mary Mack, which my classmates and I would play while we waited in the after-school car line to be picked up by our parents. 


COURTESY OF SRINITHI SRINIVASAN
Srinivasan remembers her childhood in Coimbatore fondly, always surrounded by family and neighbors.

Growing up in South India

South India is a land known for its luscious landscape, generous hospitality, heritage going back to almost two millennia and cuisine containing an assortment of spices, savories and sweets. Amid this huge universe of varieties and possibilities, I grew up in a city called Coimbatore, also known as the Manchester of South India for its booming textile industry and the rich cotton fields that surround it. 



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