Science & Technology


Drug-resistant infections threaten urban health

April 18, 2019

In Kibera, an impoverished area in Kenya’s capital city of Nairobi, widespread and uncontrolled antibiotic use is contributing to a significant increase in drug-resistant infections. Far from being an isolated example, Kibera is just one of a growing list of poor urban locations in developing countries where antibiotic resistance has become a deadly issue through a similar combination of factors. Dr. Guy Palmer, a professor at Washington State University who studies global health and infectious diseases, discussed this in an interview with the New York Times. 

 
PUBLIC DOMAIN
Antibiotic resistance is now a widespread issue in developing nations.

 
PUBLIC DOMAIN
Investigators found that ground beef was the cause of the mysterious wave of E. coli outbreak.

Solving the mysterious cause of the E. coli outbreak

April 20, 2019

On April 5, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that 72 people in five different states were ill as the result of a multistate outbreak of Escherichia coli (E. coli) with no confirmed cause. Now the outbreak has spread to at least 109 individuals, and the CDC reports that the source is most likely ground beef. 


Why is marijuana landing people in the hospital?

April 20, 2019

We’ve all heard that you can’t overdose on cannabis. This raises the question as to why, according to a recent study, a hospital in Colorado saw 9,973 cannabis-related emergency room (ER) visits between 2012 to 2016. 

 
PUBLIC DOMAIN
An increasing number of ER visits has been attributed to marijuana use.

New Zealand takes a stand on gun control

April 18, 2019

Ever since the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. last year, gun control has been at the center of political debate. Though millions have marched for their lives, countless town halls have been held, and thousands more lives have been lost to gun violence in the U.S. since Feb. 14, 2018, minimal steps have been taken to address this issue. 


Can sustainable investment fight climate change?

April 19, 2019

The Johns Hopkins Advanced Academic Programs and the National Academy of Sciences will host a Climate Change Symposium on May 3 called Changing by Degrees: Multidisciplinary Approaches to Climate Change. In light of this, students and faculty are identifying different methods of achieving sustainability.

 
PUBLIC DOMAIN
The melting of ice shelves may not have an effect on global sea levels. 

Scientists develop a way to visualize black holes

April 18, 2019

Lately there has been a buzz in the field of astronomy. On April 10, a network of telescopes all across the globe was used to produce the first image of a supermassive black hole and its shadow located in the Messier 87 galaxy. 

 
Photo Credit CC BY 3.0 / Event Horizon Telescope 
The Event Horizon Telescope captured the image of the black hole. 
ggg

Researchers discover metabolic processes of microbes

April 11, 2019

A research team at Washington University in St. Louis has been working on understanding the metabolic processes of a strain of Rhodopseudomonas palustris. This microbe is commonly found in swine waste lagoons, earthworm droppings and pond water. 


Two gene mutations can mute sensation of pain

April 11, 2019

From happily munching on chili peppers and feeling little to no pain during childbirth to accidentally ironing over her arms and being unaware of painful joint degeneration, Jo Cameron has lived a life of little pain, fear or anxiety. 

PUBLIC DOMAIN
Mutations FAAH-OUT and FAAH can make someone unable to feel pain.

COURTESY OF JAEMIE BENNETT
Panelists talked about how to find jobs after a PhD not in academia.

WOW hosts its second Women in STEM event

April 11, 2019

On Saturday, April 6, Women of Whiting (WOW) hosted their second annual Women in STEM Symposium, bringing undergraduates, graduates, and professionals together for a day to help empower women in STEM careers.


Playing team sports could lower risk for depression

April 4, 2019

A new study from the Washington University in St. Louis revealed that involvement in sports is associated with changes in young children’s brains. The study was published last February in the journal Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging. 

 
PUBLIC DOMAIN
Playing team sports as a kid was shown to reduce depressive symptoms.

 
PUBLIC DOMAIN
Using light, scientists could reduce alcohol withdrawal symptoms in rats.

Scientists could “turn off” alcohol cravings

April 4, 2019

It’s nearing midnight and you’ve spent a productive day in Brody. You’ve had dinner, but you’re feeling a bit hungry after all the time working on that assignment for that class you have. All of a sudden, you get a craving — French fries. Cravings are a common occurrence, but have you ever wondered exactly what it is that drives them?


Humans may be able to sense magnetic fields

April 4, 2019

It’s a process that allows pigeons, honey bees and whales to navigate the world through the Earth’s magnetic field. Magnetoreception, a so-called sixth, geomagnetic sense, is found in bacteria, arthropods and multiple vertebrate species. It was thought to be completely beyond the perception of beings humans.


 
PUBLIC DOMAIN
A study at the University of California, Santa Cruz showed that solitude could have benefits.

Study shows solitude can be good for mental health

April 4, 2019

In this day and age, depression amongst college students is a growing issue: According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), more than 10 percent of all college students have been diagnosed with depression. While many may believe that a telltale sign of depression can be social withdrawal and isolation, new studies conducted at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UC Santa Cruz) show that this may not always be the case; in fact, young adults who spend time alone can gain many benefits from this chosen solitude.


 
PUBLIC DOMAIN
Scientists came up with a new genetic method to revert blindness.

Gene insertion helps blind mice regain eyesight

April 4, 2019

First evolved in animals 550 million years ago, the ability to see is essential to life. It helps animals navigate the world around them. Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley), may have found a way to reverse blindness caused by retinal degeneration and give people back the ability to fully experience the world.