Published by the Students of Johns Hopkins since 1896
July 8, 2020

News & Features




FILE PHOTO
According to Spring Fair Committee members, there will still be a beer garden this year.

Is Spring Fair adapting to condensed timeline?

Billed as the nation’s largest student-run festival, Spring Fair has been an annual tradition at Hopkins for nearly half a century. This fall, an organizational review following allegations of hazing, underage drinking and other violations of the Student Conduct Code prevented Spring Fair Committee from planning the celebration, typically a yearlong endeavor.


COURTESY OF RAKESH NATARAJAN

Students discussed the political and economic effects of coronavirus.

IDEAL hosts discussion on coronavirus impact

IDEAL, a student-run nonpartisan group, hosted a coronavirus discussion roundtable to increase conversation about the social and political impacts of the disease on Wednesday, Feb. 26. The event considered the perceptions and implications of the coronavirus. 


Columnist analyzes public health and journalism

Baltimore Sun columnist Dan Rodricks gave a guest lecture at Professor Philip Leaf’s community-based learning course, “Health and Wellbeing in Baltimore: A Public Health Perspective” on Tuesday. 



Freshmen evaluate role of diversity workshops

As student facilitators begin to host this year’s Identity and Inclusion workshops, The News-Letter interviewed administrators and students on the impact that the workshops have had on the Hopkins community. All first-year and transfer students are required to attend an Identity and Inclusion workshop in the spring semester of their first year as a requirement for sophomore class registration. 


COURTESY OF SABRINA ABRAMS

Lawrence Ross discussed racism on college campuses.

Heritage 365 event explores racism in Greek life

Lawrence Ross, author of Los Angeles Times best-seller The Divine Nine: The History of African American Fraternities and Sororities, gave a talk titled “The Blackballed Lecture” on Thursday, Feb. 20. The event was held in collaboration between the Office of Multicultural Affairs (OMA), Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life, the Black Student Union, and the Black Faculty and Staff Association as part of OMA’s Heritage 365 series. 



COURTESY OF EMILY MCDONALD
About 100 people gathered outside of Shriver Hall to protest Wong and Law's views.

Hong Kong activists spark controversy at FAS

Hong Kong political activists Nathan Law and Joshua Wong participated in the Foreign Affairs Symposium’s (FAS) first event of the year in Shriver Hall on Thursday, Feb. 20. The event was moderated by East Asian Studies Lecturer Giovanna Dore. 


COURTESY OF CAS GUSTAFSSON
Roger uses comic books to help male survivors of sexual violence heal.

Local writer aims to help survivors of sexual abuse through comic books

The Sexual Assault Resource Unit (SARU) hosted local writer Kenneth Rogers, Jr., on Tuesday to speak about sexual violence, identity and healing. A Baltimore native and School of Education alum, Rogers is part of the Speakers Bureau for Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN), the nation’s largest anti-sexual violence organization. The RAINN Speakers Bureau is composed of survivors of sexual violence who volunteer to share their stories. 


COURTESY OF CHRIS PARK
Speakers discussed why students should register for the 2020 Census.

Former senator calls for participation in Census

Former Maryland Senator and Professor of Public Policy Barbara Mikulski delivered a keynote address on the 2020 U.S. Census in Levering Hall’s Glass Pavilion on Monday. She was joined by panelists Mary Elizabeth Hughes, associate scientist at the Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Austin Davis, 2020 Census manager for Baltimore City’s Department of Planning. 







COURTESY OF JACKIE RITTENHOUSE
Panelists at the forum brought up issues of transportation access and cost.

Panelists discuss the equity of Baltimore public transportation

Ida B’s Table, a restaurant in downtown Baltimore, hosted a public forum titled “Real Talk Tho: Making Public Transportation More Equitable” on Tuesday. Three panelists spoke at the forum, which focused on issues of public transportation in Baltimore: Ryan Dorsey, councilman for Baltimore’s 3rd District; LaKeisha Henderson of Bike and Brunch Tours; and Makayla Jefferson, a senior in the Baltimore City Public Schools (BCPS). 




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