news-features


Athlete of the Week: Harrison Wellman – Football

October 30, 2019

Harrison Wellmann is a sophomore wide receiver from College Station, Texas. Last Friday, Wellmann had a standout performance against the Gettysburg College Bullets that earned him Centennial Conference Offensive Player of the Week honors. 

Wellman caught two touchdowns.

Hopkins reflects on Rep. Elijah Cummings’ legacy

October 24, 2019

Elijah Cummings, a prominent Democrat from Baltimore, died at age 68 on Thursday, Oct. 17. The son of sharecroppers was serving his 13th term in the House of Representatives and chaired the Committee on Oversight and Reform, acting as a central figure in the ongoing impeachment inquiry against U.S. President Donald Trump. 

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Rep. Elijah Cummings of Baltimore died on Thursday, Oct. 17 at the age of 68.

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THE PUBLIC EDITOR: On respectfully representing survivors of sexual violence

October 24, 2019

Four and a half years ago, the University shut down the Hopkins chapter of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon after reports of sexual assault at one of the fraternity’s parties. In an editorial headlined “SAE suspension wrong, requires reversal,” The News-Letter called the decision “draconian,” prompting understandable pushback from readers.


IDEAL hosts student discussion on voter suppression

October 29, 2019

Nonpartisan student organization IDEAL held its first discussion of the year in the Mattin Center on Wednesday night. The discussion centered on the topic of voter suppression. The moderators broke the discussion into three segments: gerrymandering, voter identification laws and the franchise. 


Lecture sheds light on Montreal Life Stories project

October 24, 2019

Stéphane Martelly, affiliate assistant professor of theatre at Concordia University Montreal, gave a talk titled “What Does Sharing Authority Mean? Learning From the Life Stories Montreal Project” as part of the Engaged Humanities Speaker Series on Wednesday. 


Lecture exposes pension fund’s links to Brazil land grabs

October 28, 2019

Altamiran Ribeiro, a Brazilian land rights activist and a representative of the Pastoral Land Commission of the Catholic Church for the northeastern Brazilian state of Piauí, spoke at the University in Mergenthaler Hall on Thursday, Oct. 17. Ribeiro spoke about the mass land takeovers on behalf of large corporate developers in Brazil and the long-term consequences such land grabs can have on local communities and the environment.  

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Professor studies decision-making and the brain

November 3, 2019

Daeyeol Lee, a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Neuroscience and Psychological and Brain Sciences, researches neuroeconomics in order to understand the neural mechanisms of decision making. Lee joined Hopkins last year. Primarily, he works at the Krieger Mind/Brain Institute. 


Hopkins alum discusses barriers to AI in health care

October 24, 2019

The use of artificial intelligence (AI) in various industries is becoming increasingly widespread. Soon, AI may become more integral to hospitals. Indeed, health care might be the field that the public is most reluctant to see AI applied to. On Oct. 22, Dr. Hassan A. Tetteh addressed the employment of AI in health care in his talk titled “The Future of AI, Health, and Creativity.” He was invited by the Johns Hopkins Institute for Nanobiotechnology (INBT). 


Isik lab uses computer models to understand vision

November 3, 2019

With the blink of an eye, humans are able to extract more information than advanced computer vision systems. An image is translated from millions of pixels in seconds, and we are able to not only recognize objects and other humans, but also perceive social interactions. 

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Courtesy of Justin Greene

Agara Bio hosts event combining biology and art

October 24, 2019

Agara Bio, a community biology lab and innovation center founded by undergraduates in fall 2018, hosted “Agar Art” on Wednesday, Oct. 17 and Thursday, Oct. 18. “Agar Art” has participants trace microbes on petri dishes in order to create colorful art after the microbes are placed in an incubator. This marks one of many community-based events that Agara Bio’s organizers have held and aim to hold.


Professor introduces new book at Red Emma’s talk

October 24, 2019

Stuart Schrader, the associate director of the Program in Racism, Immigration, and Citizenship, presented his new book Badges Without Borders: How Global Counterinsurgency Transformed American Policing at Red Emma’s last Thursday. The book explores how American counterinsurgency efforts abroad informed the norms and methods of policing at home, and vice versa. 

COURTESY OF MICHAEL TRAUTMANN-RODRIGUEZ
A Hopkins sociology professor discussed U.S. policing abroad and locally.

COURTESY OF NOELA LU
A UC Berkeley professor discussed the challenges of school integration.

21st Century Cities Initiative hosts discussion on school integration in Baltimore

October 29, 2019

Rucker Johnson, the Chancellor’s Professor of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, discussed his new book Children of the Dream: Why School Integration Works on Friday. Brandon Scott, Baltimore City Council president; Cristina Evans, chair of the Teacher Chapter of the Baltimore Teachers Union Executive Board; and Eric Rice, assistant clinical professor at the School of Education, served as respondents. 21st Century Cities Initiative (21CC), an on-campus center focused on using big data to solve modern urban challenges, organized the event.


Discussion on terrorism covers white supremacy

October 24, 2019

The Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC) and the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences held a cross-campus research cluster and discussion titled “Terror in the Modern World” on Tuesday. The discussion was led by CCBC sophomore Devin Green, who gave a presentation on the different types of terrorism and the possible dangers surrounding counterterrorist legislation.

COURTESY OF CLAIRE GOUDREAU
A sophomore from CCBC led a discussion on terrorism classifications.

COURTESY OF MICHELLE LIMPE
Sonja Drimmer taught students how medieval artists deployed common archetypes of power.

UMass Amherst professor discusses the value of physical relics

October 24, 2019

As part of the Virginia Fox Stern Center Lecture Series, Sonja Drimmer, an associate professor of Medieval Art and Architecture at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, gave a talk entitled “Provisional Vision: Posters and Politics in Fifteenth-Century England“ on Tuesday. 


Speaker discusses public park systems in America

October 24, 2019

Peter Harnik, an alum and the former director of the Trust for Public Land’s Center for City Park Excellence (CCPE), gave a talk titled “Heartfelt Pathways for a Heritage City” at Cafe Azafrán on Tuesday. He was hosted by the Friends of Maryland’s Olmsted Parks and Landscapes.

COURTESY OF NATALIE WU
Peter Harnik described his ideal view of a city park management structure.

COURTESY OF BONNIE JIN
Jin reflects on the island community where her relatives grew up, which no longer exists.

Imagined villages: memories of a time past

October 24, 2019

I) I grew up with my great-grandmother and the taste of her mayujie, a crepe-like delicacy from Dachen Island. I remember long nights sitting beside her, my chubby hands against hers, as she guided me in folding my first roll. And so we sat, that Saturday in 2004, rolling hundreds of mayujie at the dining room table.


Finding happiness in the little lollipop moments

October 24, 2019

I feel as though I was happier in high school than I am now, and there are probably a number of reasons for that. One I’d like to discuss, though, is the fact that I’ve stopped giving credit to my lollipop moments. 

COURTESY OF GABI SWISTARA
Swistara keeps a journal of the little moments that make an impact on her.

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Where should the line for financial aid be?

October 28, 2019

Moving off campus is expensive. Like, ridiculously expensive. For the first time in your life you have to start worrying about rent, renter’s insurance, electricity, internet and water. This is, of course, along with the one-time payments like security deposits or application fees. But that is only the start. Unless you go for a more expensive, furnished apartment or take over a room from a graduating friend, you have to buy an apartment’s worth of furniture.