Published by the Students of Johns Hopkins since 1896
September 24, 2020

news-features





FREDERIC C. CHALFANT / CC BY-SA 3.0
Homewood Field is the home to a number of fall sports programs, including football, men’s and women’s soccer, and field hockey. 

Centennial Conference suspends fall sports until September

The Centennial Conference announced the indefinite suspension of all its fall sports on July 7. 17 out of the 24 Hopkins Division-III athletic teams compete in the Centennial Conference and will not be allowed to play conference games. The Conference noted that this decision would be reevaluated by the end of September. 





COURTESY OF KATY WILNER
Public Editor Jake Lefkovitz is distributing a survey to better understand The News-Letter’s readers.

THE PUBLIC EDITOR: Won't you be our readers?

Today, the future looks uncertain, and the conditions of life seem untenable. This is what it means to live in times of crisis. And in times such as these, the journalist’s highest form of service is to faithfully deliver to the public whatever measure of clarity and understanding that they can. But to do that, they need the public’s trust. They need to have earned it in the past, and to have kept earning it ever since.



THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY / PUBLIC DOMAIN
Love, Victor offers a representation of the experiences of people of color in the LGBTQ community.  

Love, Victor speaks to a rocky reality

Providing a renovation of the queer teen love story Love, Simon from 2018, the newly released TV series Love, Victor takes place in the same setting of Creekwood High School, with new characters and a different story. Victor Salazar, the protagonist of the new show, is a Puerto Rican with a “beautiful cinnamon complexion” from Texas who, despite financial shortcomings, has moved with his family to the more affluent school district of Creekwood High. 


Letter to the Editor 07/02/2020

As president of our Student Government Association (SGA) and a member of the University-wide steering committee, I’ve been involved in fall planning for months. Equity has been a priority, and feedback is valuable. I thank the author of this article for airing their thoughts, but I would be remiss if I didn’t share my disagreement.  


COURTESY OF RUDY MALCOM

According to Furstenberg, those inside the “Garland Hall bubble” have caused damage to the University through their austerity measures.

Hopkins puts its credit rating ahead of its people

What do you call the phase of spending cuts that precedes thoughtful, deliberative planning? This was the question I was left with earlier this month, after a virtual town hall on budgetary decisions made by the University leadership in light of the coronavirus (COVID-19).


Jay Chou’s "Mojito" suggests that sometimes, it’s okay to be happy

International pop star Jay Chou dropped his newest single, “Mojito,” on June 12. Released alongside a vibrant music video in which he wanders through Cuban streets with his band, it was a much-anticipated release for ardent fans of Chou, whose last album Jay Chou’s Bedtime Stories came out in 2016. He has only released four singles since, including “Mojito.” 


FILE PHOTO
SGA signed a petition demanding the University end its plans for the private police force.

SGA votes to rename Woodrow Wilson Fellowship

The Student Government Association (SGA) met for the second time this summer on June 30 over Zoom. At the meeting, SGA voted unanimously to support renaming the Woodrow Wilson Fellowship and Gildersleeve House of AMR II in support of the Black Lives Matter movement. The group also signed the petition calling for the University to permanently end its plans for the Johns Hopkins Police Department (JHPD). 




COURTESY OF MICHELLE LIMPE
The Atlas Restaurant Group faces dress code backlash after manager refused to seat a Black child.

Baltimore restaurant reignites controversy after denying service to Black customer

Atlas Restaurant Group apologized after a Black woman posted a video of her and her son being denied service at Ouzo Bay in Harbor East on June 21. In the video, which has since been widely circulated on social media, a white manager denies service to the Black woman and her son because her son was wearing athletic clothing. The video shows a white child in similar clothing dining at the restaurant.


FILE PHOTO
As Baltimore begins to reopen, Mayor Young has lifted the ban on large outdoor gatherings.

Young lifts Baltimore's outdoor gathering ban

Baltimore City Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young lifted the city’s ban on large outdoor gatherings beginning June 26. This decision comes one week after Young moved the city into phase two of Maryland’s re-opening plan, following shutdowns to prevent the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19).  


FILE PHOTO
Santra argues that students shouldn’t have to decide between safety and their education.

We all miss campus, but making the return optional isn’t equitable

A choose-your-own-adventure fall experience sounds ideal in theory. Those who want to come back to Baltimore may, and those who would rather play it safe stay home. Simple. Yet the University is making an important oversight in splitting the student population into on-campus and off-campus groups. Despite Daniels’ purported “keen focus on equity and fairness,” an optional return to campus is inherently inequitable for those remaining off campus.  



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