news-features


Hopkins alum discusses barriers to AI in health care

October 24, 2019

The use of artificial intelligence (AI) in various industries is becoming increasingly widespread. Soon, AI may become more integral to hospitals. Indeed, health care might be the field that the public is most reluctant to see AI applied to. On Oct. ...


Isik lab uses computer models to understand vision

November 3, 2019

With the blink of an eye, humans are able to extract more information than advanced computer vision systems. An image is translated from millions of pixels in seconds, and we are able to not only recognize objects and other humans, but also perceive social interactions. 

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Courtesy of Justin Greene

Agara Bio hosts event combining biology and art

October 24, 2019

Agara Bio, a community biology lab and innovation center founded by undergraduates in fall 2018, hosted “Agar Art” on Wednesday, Oct. 17 and Thursday, Oct. 18. “Agar Art” has participants trace microbes on petri dishes in order to create colorful art after the microbes are placed in an incubator. This marks one of many community-based events that Agara Bio’s organizers have held and aim to hold.


Professor introduces new book at Red Emma’s talk

October 24, 2019

Stuart Schrader, the associate director of the Program in Racism, Immigration, and Citizenship, presented his new book Badges Without Borders: How Global Counterinsurgency Transformed American Policing at Red Emma’s last Thursday. The book explores how American counterinsurgency efforts abroad informed the norms and methods of policing at home, and vice versa. 

COURTESY OF MICHAEL TRAUTMANN-RODRIGUEZ
A Hopkins sociology professor discussed U.S. policing abroad and locally.

COURTESY OF NOELA LU
A UC Berkeley professor discussed the challenges of school integration.

21st Century Cities Initiative hosts discussion on school integration in Baltimore

October 29, 2019

Rucker Johnson, the Chancellor’s Professor of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, discussed his new book Children of the Dream: Why School Integration Works on Friday. Brandon Scott, Baltimore City Council president; Cristina Evans, chair of the Teacher Chapter of the Baltimore Teachers Union Executive Board; and Eric Rice, assistant clinical professor at the School of Education, served as respondents. 21st Century Cities Initiative (21CC), an on-campus center focused on using big data to solve modern urban challenges, organized the event.


Discussion on terrorism covers white supremacy

October 24, 2019

The Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC) and the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences held a cross-campus research cluster and discussion titled “Terror in the Modern World” on Tuesday. The discussion was led by CCBC sophomore Devin Green, who gave a presentation on the different types of terrorism and the possible dangers surrounding counterterrorist legislation.

COURTESY OF CLAIRE GOUDREAU
A sophomore from CCBC led a discussion on terrorism classifications.

COURTESY OF MICHELLE LIMPE
Sonja Drimmer taught students how medieval artists deployed common archetypes of power.

UMass Amherst professor discusses the value of physical relics

October 24, 2019

As part of the Virginia Fox Stern Center Lecture Series, Sonja Drimmer, an associate professor of Medieval Art and Architecture at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, gave a talk entitled “Provisional Vision: Posters and Politics in Fifteenth-Century England“ on Tuesday. 


Speaker discusses public park systems in America

October 24, 2019

Peter Harnik, an alum and the former director of the Trust for Public Land’s Center for City Park Excellence (CCPE), gave a talk titled “Heartfelt Pathways for a Heritage City” at Cafe Azafrán on Tuesday. He was hosted by the Friends of Maryland’s Olmsted Parks and Landscapes.

COURTESY OF NATALIE WU
Peter Harnik described his ideal view of a city park management structure.

COURTESY OF BONNIE JIN
Jin reflects on the island community where her relatives grew up, which no longer exists.

Imagined villages: memories of a time past

October 24, 2019

I) I grew up with my great-grandmother and the taste of her mayujie, a crepe-like delicacy from Dachen Island. I remember long nights sitting beside her, my chubby hands against hers, as she guided me in folding my first roll. And so we sat, that Saturday in 2004, rolling hundreds of mayujie at the dining room table.


Finding happiness in the little lollipop moments

October 24, 2019

I feel as though I was happier in high school than I am now, and there are probably a number of reasons for that. One I’d like to discuss, though, is the fact that I’ve stopped giving credit to my lollipop moments. 

COURTESY OF GABI SWISTARA
Swistara keeps a journal of the little moments that make an impact on her.

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Where should the line for financial aid be?

October 28, 2019

Moving off campus is expensive. Like, ridiculously expensive. For the first time in your life you have to start worrying about rent, renter’s insurance, electricity, internet and water. This is, of course, along with the one-time payments like security deposits or application fees. But that is only the start. Unless you go for a more expensive, furnished apartment or take over a room from a graduating friend, you have to buy an apartment’s worth of furniture.


What it means to really take a break from school

October 23, 2019

Like most people at Hopkins, I had a bit of a hell week about three weeks ago. Three big projects, two tests, all within the span of about four days — if you’re a Hopkins student, you probably know that drill. 

COURTESY OF DIVA PAREKH
Parekh’s trip offered her a new perspective on disconnecting from work.

COURTESY OF ADDY PERLMAN
After dreaming of city life, Perlman has come to love her small hometown.

Learning to appreciate my small-town home

October 23, 2019

I watched from the circular window as the fields of corn and the old courthouse shrunk to figurines. I left Valdosta. And I had been dreaming of this day since I was a kid. I always craved a life in a bustling city up north or out west, and it was finally my time. Baltimore needed to get ready for the country girl coming to town.


New JHUnions director considers student culture

October 24, 2019

Hal Turner was appointed as the University’s inaugural director of JHUnions & Programming this August. In this role, Turner oversees student groups such as the Hopkins Organization for Programming (HOP), the JHUnions Programming Board, Hoptoberfest, the Johns Hopkins University Model United Nations Conference (JHUMUNC) and Spring Fair. 

COURTESY OF HAL TURNER 
Hal Turner became the University’s first director for JHUnions & Programming in August.

COURTESY OF KATY WILNER
Santoro and Real Food Hopkins support the Pour Out Pepsi campaign, which urges the University to end its exclusivity contract with Pepsi. 

The argument for Pour Out Pepsi’s campaign

October 24, 2019

I think it’s safe to say that we all know about how soda and other sugary drinks are extremely unhealthy and can increase our risk to certain diseases in the future. We also know that the largest corporations that contribute to these trends are PepsiCo and Coca-Cola. Unfortunately, Hopkins has an exclusive pouring rights contract with Pepsi. The Real Food Hopkins student group is trying to break that contract up. Here’s why. 


The role of Andrew Yang as an Asian-American representative

October 24, 2019

On Oct. 15, I attended the Milton S. Eisenhower Symposium sponsored talk featuring Kenan Thompson, the longest-running Saturday Night Live (SNL) cast member. Although the night was mostly filled with laughs, during the question-and-answer section, one student addressed the recent SNL controversy surrounding Shane Gillis. 

CC BY-SA 2.0/Gage Skidmore
Wu thinks that Yang should seriously consider his influence an Asian-American leader.

Ramen Utsuke is the best value ramen in the city

October 24, 2019

Where do you go when you are half an hour outside the city at Ikea, and you’re hungry and tired from all that furniture shopping? This past weekend, my roommate and I decided the correct answer to that question meant driving across the city to the Inner Harbor/Federal Hill area and leaving all of our new furniture in the back of the Zipcar pickup truck. Ramen Utsuke, with its bright bold letters outside of a brand spanking new building, caught my eye as I drove along Key Highway with my new furniture and an empty stomach.

COURTESY OF AUBIN LOHIER
Ramen Utsuke is the best bang for your buck noodle spot in town.

CC BY 2.0 Krystal M. Garrett/Kasie P. Whitfield
Skyzone is full of fun bouncy times, reminding Chen of childhood times.

Sky Zone offers a bouncy getaway from adult life

October 24, 2019

Last week I went to Sky Zone in Timonium for my friend Sophia’s birthday. I hadn’t been to a trampoline park in years — not since my friend Naomi’s fourth grade birthday party, when I met Anne and didn’t like her. I remember having fun at the time, but it was normal. I used to go to Kira’s house all the time to jump on her trampoline, and I remember doing somersaults on Ivy’s during late night dinner parties. This was normal.