news-features


Lawyer calls on Asian American community to unite

April 18, 2019

Ronak D. Desai gave the Asian-Pacific Heritage Celebratory Keynote Address in the Glass Pavilion on April 15. His presentation focused on Asian American narratives and the challenges that the community faces. Desai, a lawyer and Hopkins alum, is an affiliate ...


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Sit-in in Garland Hall continues on day 15

April 20, 2019

For over two weeks, members of the Hopkins and Baltimore community have participated in a sit-in at Garland Hall to protest the proposed private police force and the University’s contracts with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). 


Local journalists explore media and news in the 21st century

April 18, 2019

Inform, Discuss, Enlighten, Acknowledge, Learn (IDEAL) JHU hosted a discussion on the role of local news and journalism in Baltimore on Wednesday, April 18. The discussion was moderated by Political Science Professor Emeritus and Academy Professor Matthew Crenson. The event featured Doug Donovan, an investigative reporter at the Baltimore Sun, and Ron Cassie, a senior editor at Baltimore Magazine. 


Opening myself up to embrace change in life

April 18, 2019

I’m not the type of person who opens up. I don’t have a lot of experience letting the people around me know how I’m feeling at any given moment. I often feel like I’m caught between who I am and who other people think I am. As a result it feels like I’m constantly walking on eggshells to be the person everyone expects me to be. That’s always been difficult for me, but I thought it was just normal. I thought walking on eggshells was human nature.


Burnt out? Us too.

April 18, 2019

Writing about work culture at Hopkins is tricky. We acknowledge that we are extremely privileged to be able to attend college, surrounded by scholars who are the very best in their field and peers who are already accomplishing so much. We are grateful to pursue our higher education in Baltimore, at one of the nation’s top institutions. And yet, as finals approach, and Brody remains full, many of us are burnt out. 

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Students march on University President’s house

April 18, 2019

Hopkins and Baltimore community members met for a third rally to protest the Hopkins private police force, University contracts with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and promote Justice for Tyrone West on Wednesday, April 17 in Wyman Park Dell. The rally was organized by members of Students Against Private Police (SAPP), Hopkins Coalition Against ICE (HCAI) and leaders of West Wednesdays, a weekly vigil held in honor of West, who died in 2013 while in police custody. Morgan State University police officers were investigated in conjunction with West’s death. 


Panelists discuss menstrual health and hygiene

April 18, 2019

Wings, a student group aiming to improve menstrual health and hygiene, and Sexual Assault Resource Unit (SARU), a student group advocating for increased awareness of rape culture and sexual violence, hosted a panel titled “Health Justice, Policy and Equity” on Wednesday. The panelists discussed barriers to menstrual and sexual health equity and the policies surrounding those topics. 

 
courtesy of Mary Shepard
Wings partnered with SARU to host the panel on reproductive health.

COURTESY OF SHERRY KIM
The Humanities Center in Gilman Hall offers interdisciplinary courses.

Hopkins releases second Diversity Roadmap update

April 18, 2019

University President Ronald J. Daniels and Provost Sunil Kumar released the second progress report on the Roadmap on Diversity and Inclusion on Friday. University officials drafted the Roadmap, a document outlining plans to make Hopkins more diverse, following the Black Student Union’s (BSU) 2015 protests and list of demands. 


Indian American author explains the inspiration for her first novel

April 24, 2019

Mathangi Subramanian, an award-winning Indian American author, gave a presentation on her book, A People’s History of Heaven, at Red Emma’s Bookstore on Wednesday, April 17. This work, which revolves around five girls and their mothers who live in a small village in Bangalore, India, is her first piece of literary fiction. 


COURTESY OF LAURA NUGENT

Shua recognize the importance of entertainment in reminding us of the horrors of the Holocaust. 

We need portrayals of the Holocaust more than ever

April 18, 2019

Last weekend I saw the Barnstormers’ production of Cabaret. It was the second week of the show’s run, so I had some background on the musical. It takes place in 1930s Berlin. There is a lot of sex. A Nazi is involved. It’s an interesting show, to say the least.


Why I won’t take the Enrolled Student Survey

April 20, 2019

Earlier this week, Vice Provost for Student Affairs Kevin Shollenberger sent out a survey to enrolled undergraduates as part of “continuing efforts to review and improve the Johns Hopkins experience.”

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Activist Ava Pipitone linked gender to white supremacy and imperialism.

Ava Pipitone discusses transgender identities

April 18, 2019

Ava Pipitone, the executive director of the Baltimore Transgender Alliance, discussed how gender relates to all aspects of life — including race and class — at an event called Trans Issues are not Trans Issues. The Impact Hub hosted the event, which took place on Tuesday.


SGA creates new civic innovation funding

April 18, 2019

Student Government Association (SGA) members discussed a new civic innovation grant and fund at their weekly meeting in Charles Commons on Tuesday. Executive President AJ Tsang pledged to donate funding to create the grant, which he intends to promote and sustain student activism on campus. 


Owning my style and being more confident in my fashion choices

April 18, 2019

This morning I emerged from the shower, fully prepared to dress myself in the clothes I had picked out last night, and paused. “What am I getting dressed up for?” I flashed back to 16-year-old me picking out high-waisted black pants from my uniform and remembered hearing, “You’re going to school, it’s not a fashion show.” Slightly reluctantly, I zipped up my red knee-high boots, wrapped my sparkly black, white and red coat around me, and tossed my tote bag on my arm.

 
COURTESY OF ARROSER/ CC BY-SA 3.0
A pair of Louboutin shoes or a sparkly coat can be a source of confidence.

 
COURTESY OF LAURA NUGENT
Cabaret made Oing rethink how to reconcile differences of opinion.

Reconciling political differences in friendships

April 18, 2019

In this week’s issue of Art and Activism, I will be taking a break from my regularly-scheduled programming (i.e. socially-engaged film and fiction) to talk about socially-engaged theatre, specifically the Barnstormers spring musical production of Cabaret. First performed in 1966, Cabaret focuses on a cast of characters in a seedy nightclub in 1930s Berlin. The German political scene is rapidly changing as an American man named Clifford Bradshaw falls in love with one of the nightclub’s dancers, an English woman named Sally Bowles. 


Reflecting on the experiences of the women who made me who I am today

May 2, 2019

My grandmother grew up in an orphanage — not because she didn’t have a family but because she couldn’t find them. She was six-years-old, maybe seven, when she was separated from them during the Korean War. Raised by the Anglican nuns at the orphanage, she graduated first in her class and left at 18-years-old to pursue a college education during a time when few people, let alone women, had college degrees.

COURTESY OF KELSEY KO
Ko was raised by her grandmother in Korea until she was four years old.

Daniels votes in favor of Pugh’s resignation

April 18, 2019

The Greater Baltimore Committee (GBC) voted unanimously in favor of Mayor Catherine Pugh’s resignation on Friday, April 12. The Committee deemed Pugh unfit for office after mass controversy surrounding her book sales. 


Aaron Long, Class of 1988, poses with his girlfriend, mother and a few of his biological children.

Hopkins alum Aaron Long may have fathered as many as 67 children

April 18, 2019

Aaron Long estimates that he has fathered 67 children. The Hopkins alum graduated in 1988 and has, in his own words, become sort of famous. Long is a writer and communications specialist from Seattle. In his 20s, while broke and living at home, Long donated his sperm twice a week for an entire year to earn a little extra cash. He did not think much of these donations until a few decades later.