Published by the Students of Johns Hopkins since 1896
April 4, 2020 | °F in Baltimore

Arts & Entertainment



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Jamie Lee Curtis plays successful businesswoman who protects her family.

Knives Out is a fresh and riveting murder mystery

I’ll just start off this review by saying that there was very little possibility that I was not going to enjoy Knives Out. I’ve been in love with the murder mysteries ever since I stayed up all night reading Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None in sixth grade, so a film based around the key motifs of her style — an eccentric detective, an ornate mansion, a web of lies and an overly-complicated murder plot — was almost certainly going to be a hit in my eyes.


The Come Up Show/CC By-S.A-2.0
Drake was boo’ed off stage at Tyler, The Creator’s Camp Flog Naw festival by Frank Ocean fans.

Fandoms can be like family. They can also be toxic.

Thanksgiving Day was marked by a rare occurrence this year — a Lil Uzi Vert tweet storm. Addressing his long delayed sophomore album Eternal Atake, Uzi began: “I wanna let My Family know… and I say Family because all the fans left a long time ago. Only Family Stays so if you stayed I’m Thankful for U.” 




GAGE SKIDMORE/CC BY-S.A 2.0
Lin-Manuel Miranda plays Lee Scoresby in the newly released adaptation.

His Dark Materials TV adaptation starts off strong

If you’re like me, vague memories of Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials: The Golden Compass and its cinematic iteration wove themselves intermittently throughout your childhood. Although they were less beloved than Harry Potter, less modern than Percy Jackson & the Olympians and less classic than The Chronicles of Narnia, they are perhaps the most timeless and successfully constructed stories of them all (although the 2007 movie adaptation garnered a fair amount of criticism). 


New Disney+ service offers impressive collection

Disney was a big part of my childhood. And over time, after releasing sequels to my favorite movies and acquiring film production companies such as Pixar in 2006 and Lucasfilms in 2012, Disney managed to become an even bigger part of my childhood. But building up to the Nov. 12 release of Disney+, a new streaming service for Disney-owned content, I wasn’t that excited.


COURTESY OF KATY OH
Dave Burrell opened with an incredible sequence of his original pieces. 

Jazz legends visit and perform at Peabody

This past weekend, in conjunction with the two-day jazz symposium at Hopkins, An Die Musik LIVE! presented two jazz luminaries on Saturday night who were pivotal to the free jazz scene in France at the turn of the 1970s.


COURTESY OF COLE DOUGLASS
Students from many diverse communities performed at the Culture Show.

32nd Annual Culture Show showcases student talent

The Office of Multicultural Affairs hosted the 32nd Annual Culture Show on Friday, Nov. 15. The event featured performances by 14 student groups — from the Gospel Choir’s heavenly harmonies to the Ladybirds’ sharp, graceful dance routines — all of which were centered around the event’s themes of resilience and strength, succinctly summarized by the event’s tag line: “We Rise.” 


COURTESY OF PROFESSOR SCHILLING 
Legendary avant-garde saxophonist Archie Shepp attended the symposium.

Historical figures in avant-garde jazz reunite at symposium

The University held a free two-day symposium, “Paris/Algiers 1969: Declarations of Freedom by the Black American Avant-Garde,” on Friday, Nov. 15 and Saturday, Nov. 16. The Centre Louis Marin for Interdisciplinary French Studies organized the event with the support of the French Embassy in the United States, and the symposium director was none other than Hopkins Professor and Chair of German and Romance Languages and Literatures, Professor Derek Schilling. 


COURTESY OF KANAK GUPTA
DIETANIUM emerged victorious against defending champion Stormsketch.

Artists rumble at Super Art Fight 2019

As the crowd chanted “Taco Bell! Taco Bell!” five minutes into “Super Art Fight: Thanksgiving Thrashing,” I knew this night was going to be wild. This Thanksgiving edition of the strange collision between wrestling and live art, or “the greatest live art competition in the known universe,” as it calls itself, took place at Ottobar on Friday, Nov. 15. 


COURTESY OF DANYA QATO
The final event opened with a performance from the band Conjunto Bruja.

Not a Film Fest sparks conversations on resistance

This past Sunday, Nov. 10, “Not a Film Fest: Anticolonial Conversations in Baltimore” wrapped up with its third and final day. Baltimore-Palestine Solidarity (BPS) presented the event, which began on Oct. 20 at the Baltimore American Indian Center and continued its second day on Oct. 27 at the 2640 Space before concluding this Sunday at the Creative Alliance in Patterson Park. 


FKA twigs’ sophomore album Magdalene defies genre

I find myself listening to music all the time, whether it’s while working out or just sitting on my bed, but once I get hooked on one song, I will continuously play it on loop until someone begs me to stop humming the earworm-triggering tune. 


COURTESY OF ELIZA ZIMMERMAN
King Princess’ intimate show at the 9:30 Club in D.C. featured inventive makeup, props and sets.

King Princess delivers intimate performance in D.C.

Before coming to Hopkins, I had already started laying out extravagant plans for concert-viewing in D.C. The fall lineup is always ripe, no matter what part of the country you’re in, and I even had an app that scanned my Spotify music library to track who was passing through and where they were playing. 


COURTESY OF EUNICE PARK 
Sarah Aroeste performed in Ladino, the language of the Sephardim.

Multimedia performance honors Sephardic Jews

Present day commemorations, whether in the form of service, art or expression, are irreplaceable markers of historical narratives that must not be forgotten. The Greek Chamber Music Project (GCMP), is an arts presenter and record label devoted to performing the eccentric music of Greek composers. On Tuesday, Nov. 5, GCMP presented an emotionally-charged and impactful program at the Peabody Institute in memory of the Holocaust, called Remembering the Jews of Greece: A Musical Journey. 



 COURTESY OF ALEX HECKSHER GOMES
JPEGMAFIA performed at the Ottobar in Baltimore for an animated and sweat-drenched crowd.  

JPEGMAFIA concludes 2019 tour in Baltimore

JPEGMAFIA returned to Baltimore on Saturday, Nov. 9 for the final leg of his JPEGMAFIA Type Tour and played to a sold-out audience at the Ottobar. This tour follows the release of Peggy’s newest album, All My Heroes Are Cornballs. Opening for JPEG on his tour was Butch Dawson, a rapper and producer from West Baltimore. 




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