Published by the Students of Johns Hopkins since 1896
April 16, 2024

Hopkins releases Regular Decision results following highly selective admissions cycle

By NICK DAUM | March 29, 2024

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STEVEN SIMPSON / PHOTO EDITOR

The University admitted a total of 2,558 students to the Class of 2028.

On March 20, the University announced its Regular Decision results, finalizing the selection of students accepted to the Class of 2028 in the regular admissions cycle. 

In total, 1,749 applicants were admitted in the Regular Decisions round, with 52 countries and 49 U.S. states being represented. The total number of students admitted for the Class of 2028 was 2,558, with 809 being admitted in the two Early Decision rounds. This was the first time in four years that the number of admitted students increased from the previous year.

On behalf of the University, Deputy Dean of Undergraduate Admissions Calvin Wise commented on his pleasure with the quality of incoming students in an interview with Johns Hopkins Media Relations.

"These students have demonstrated through their applications that their values align with ours here at Hopkins. It's exciting to see the many creative ways these students are already applying what they learn to make an impact in their communities," he said. “Class of 2028 represents some of the brightest, most driven young people from across the globe.”

The number of admitted students represents an increase from last year, when slightly over 2,400 applicants were given acceptance letters. However, the acceptance rate remains constant at roughly 6.2% as over 38,000 prospective students applied. This leaves Hopkins as one of the most selective universities in the country. 

Several admitted students shared their reasons for applying to Hopkins with The News-Letter. Common responses included the University’s strong reputation, especially in STEM, and opportunities for research.

In an email with The News-Letter, admitted student Finnigan Keane, a prospective Archeology major, expressed his excitement for the University’s strong program in his desired field of study and the vibrant community.

“I applied to Johns Hopkins because of their Archaeology program and their LGBTQ+ friendly social life,” he wrote. “I’m excited to meet my classmates and see the campus! I also look forward to joining extracurriculars in the performing arts.”

Students in the Regular Decision pool chose Hopkins for a variety of other reasons, including the University’s proximity to home for Maryland residents, the beauty of the campus and affordability based on financial aid. Some, including prospective computer science major Saria Malik, were also interested in the University’s unique fields of study, like the Robotics minor. 

Besides their reasons for applying, students commented on their interest in meeting new people and engaging in the campus community. In an email to The News-Letter, Alysa Peng wrote about these interests as well as concerns about the difficulty of college coursework.

“I'm most excited for the chance to meet a lot of new people and roommates,” she wrote. “But I'm nervous about how rigorous courses are going to be.”

Though several students expressed concern about the academic rigor at Hopkins, most were optimistic about their upcoming college experience and expressed positive feelings toward joining the campus community. 

The University also released statistics on the qualifications and activities of incoming students. Of the accepted class, almost 90% held jobs or internships at some point in high school, and more than half were involved in athletics. Most students were also active in the arts, including music, performing arts and dance.

Of incoming students, roughly 40% will enroll in the Whiting School of Engineering, while 60% intend to enroll in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences. 


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