Published by the Students of Johns Hopkins since 1896
December 9, 2022

Arts & Entertainment






RUBEN ORTEGA/CC BY-SA 4.0
Patrick Ness is the author of the book that Chaos Walking is based on.

Chaos Walking is weighed down by missteps and predictability

One of the first science fiction movies of the year, Chaos Walking (in theaters now) appears to show great promise. With its slick premise, enrapturing action and striking title, it has every look of a sci-fi fan’s dream come true. To top it off, its star-studded cast includes the likes of Tom Holland, Daisy Ridley and Mads Mikkelsen, and behind the camera is director Doug Liman, responsible for the critically acclaimed Edge of Tomorrow.


PEABODY AWARDS/CC-BY-2.0
Amy Poehler directed and starred in the movie Moxie.

Netflix’s Moxie will make you cry, just give it some time

A little less than halfway through Netflix’s new movie Moxie, I texted my girlfriend, “This movie is making me feel conflicted. I can’t tell if it’s good or not.” And I couldn’t: The first half of this film oscillates greatly in quality. It takes a while to get going, and even once the main plot really starts to take centerstage, the stakes of the movie are still tremendously unclear. There are moments of brilliance sprinkled throughout the first half of the movie — it certainly wasn’t bad — but I was far from convinced.


GAGE SKIDMORE/CC BY-SA 3.0
Paul Bettany plays both versions of the character Vision in WandaVision.

WandaVision redefines the superhero genre

Following the incredible commercial success of Avengers: Endgame, I, like many others, wondered how Marvel would ever surpass the film’s and its predecessors’ sheer scope and magnitude. Was it something that they would even be able to pull off? Was it even worth attempting to do so? WandaVision is a curious answer to these questions. 


COSMOPOLITAN U.K./CC-BY-3.0
Awkwafina, who plays the dragon Sisu, is one of the best parts of the film.

Raya and the Last Dragon is both beautiful and flawed

After a series of trailers, Raya and the Last Dragon finally premiered on March 5. The movie begins with an elaborate two-dimensional animation of Kumandra, a once-united land that now appears unrecognizable to the current inhabitants, who are divided into different territories.


MTV INTERNATIONAL/CC BY 3.0
Beer’s new album Life Support is an emotional adventure of self-discovery and renewal. 

Madison Beer’s new album Life Support does not disappoint

Last week, Madison Beer released her debut album Life Support. This album was Beer’s response to years of turmoil: being dropped by her label and diagnosed with borderline personality disorder as many of her personal relationships suffered, all while facing constant scrutiny as a teenage star on social media.


COURTESY OF SARAH JUNG
Dance at Le moulin de la Galette was one of his many works presented during his birthday livestream event.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir’s 180th birthday celebrated through livestream

On Feb. 25 I celebrated one of my favorite artist’s birthdays at the “Pierre-Auguste Renoir 180th Birthday — Livestream Art Program” hosted by Robert Kelleman, founder and director of non-profit organization Washington, D.C. History & Culture. As a participant of the virtual art gallery tour, I was fondly reminded of my previous tourist experiences in art galleries. 


EVA RINALDI/CC BY-SA 2.0
Jason Sudeikis accepted his award for Best Actor in a Musical or Comedy TV Series while wearing a sweatshirt.

78th Golden Globes, though heartfelt and amusing, loses magic to online format

The 78th Golden Globe Awards kicked off the 2021 film and TV awards season on Sunday. As expected, it was a mostly virtual ceremony, with nominees tuning in through Zoom and presenters showing up in-person at their respective bicoastal locations. Hosts Tina Fey and Amy Poehler returned, and with already three hosting turns already under their belts, it promised to be an eventful, no-holds-barred kind of night. 



COURTESY OF SARAH JUNG
Daniil Trifonov showed off his musical talent to Hopkins students in a virtual recital. 

Shriver Hall Concert Series hosts Daniil Trifonov's virtual concert

This past Sunday, the Shriver Hall Concert Series livestreamed Daniil Trifonov’s pre-recorded piano program from New York's 92nd Street Y. The virtually delivered event was a success, with over 200 live attendees from around the world — highlighting Trifonov’s international presence.



EDWARD BURTYNSKY/CC BY 2.0
Burtynsky’s photographs highlight the effect of industry on nature, one of the themes of the show.

Photography workshop highlights relations between laborers, factories and media

The History of Art and East Asian Studies departments sponsored an event titled “Documenting Industry: Photography, Modernity and the Nation in India and China” on Feb. 19. Scholars from around the world joined the Zoom-recorded event, presenting original research on ways in which documentary photographers have explored the lives of industrial laborers in India and China. 




PICASA/CC BY 3.0
To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before takes on Netflix’s Top 10 as fans finally get to watch the long-awaited finale. 

Imperfections aside, To All the Boys: Always and Forever is a heartwarming finale

The teen romance trilogy that started with a bang is now coming to a long-awaited end. To All the Boys: Always and Forever marks the last time we’ll see the much-beloved on-screen couple, though it won’t necessarily mark the end of their love story. This time, Lara Jean Covey (Lana Condor) and Peter Kavinsky (Noah Centineo) face the ups and downs of senior year of high school, coupled with the stress of the uncharted territory that awaits them after graduation.


COURTESY OF JHU BARNSTORMERS
A still from the Barnstormers’ production of Clue: Stay at Home.

Clue: Stay at Home is a Zoom success

The Barnstormers return to our home-theaters once again with the warmth of easy-going comedy and the intrigue of a classic “whodunnit” narrative in their special Clue: Stay at Home. The production was a livestreamed virtual adaptation of Clue, a screenplay inspired by the timeless Hasbro board game and iconic film of the same name.


You Will Die at 20 is visually and emotionally breathtaking

Over the last 11 months, I’ve found it increasingly hard to sit through a movie in one sitting or even to coax myself into viewing a film at all, really. Since I’m on my computer all the time, seated in one place for classes and work, sitting down to watch something online for a couple of hours has become incredibly unappealing.


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