news-features


IFC hosts interfaith discussion

October 25, 2001

The concepts of tolerance and respect for the Islamic faith pervaded the first interfaith discussion, "Is Positive Plurality Possible?," in the Johns Hopkins Interfaith Center on Monday.


Farrar blends alterna-rock and country with success

October 25, 2001

Hey, all you college radio listeners and Wilco fans, this article is not for you. Why? That's because you have already heard of Jay Farrar and his new album Sebastopol. This is for everyone else out there that may have never been exposed.


Who gets to return to normal? - Sine Qua Non

October 25, 2001

Responding to the terrible deeds of Sept. 11, our leaders have united in support of a war against terrorism. Additionally, in the wake of the worst attack in our nation's history, they have encouraged us to "get back to normal."


Student athlete of the week: Football's giant, Leif Glynn

October 25, 2001

"People see my size and the first thing they ask me is what position I play," Leif Glynn, an offensive tackle on the Hopkins football team, explains. "In some ways I get a kick out of that attention, but then I just hope that people don't just assume I am just some big, dumb guy who just eats, drinks, and plays football.


Give a man a waffle and he'll be full all day

October 25, 2001

1955 was a banner year for fast food. In California, Ray Kroc founded McDonalds, the chain that people around the world associate with American cultural hegemony as much as with the Big Mac. That same year, the first Waffle House opened in Avondale Estates, Ga. While Russians line up around the block in the bitter cold for McNuggets and Quarter Pounders with Cheese, Waffle House has not spread far beyond its native south, which really is the rest of the world's loss.


Field Hockey team wins sixth straight

October 25, 2001

The Johns Hopkins Field Hockey team proved that they are contenders this past week. They extended their past week's two game streak to an astonishing six game winning streak to improve their overall record to 9-8. More importantly, their Centennial Conference record is now a strong 6-3.


Radel, Coe among freshman class winners

October 25, 2001

The winners of the class of 2005 elections were President Ben Radel, Vice President Megan Coe, Secretary/Treasurer Shannon Chang and Representatives Morgan MacDonald, Charles Reyner and Manu Sharma. There were seven candidates for president, four for vice president, two for secretary/treasurer and seven for representative. The elections were held from 12 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 8 and the results were announced on Tuesday at the weekly Student Council meeting.


Meningitis an Issue

October 25, 2001

Are the words of this article fading into a mass of black smudges to the pounding rhythm of your aching head? Are you abnormally hot or feverish? Does your neck feel like you just took a lengthy test, the searing pain shattering your concentration with the slightest neck movement?


The Godfather Trilogy: Epitome of manliness?

October 25, 2001

The Godfather saga, arguably the greatest story of all time, describes the successful yet decadent world of a powerful Mafia family. Not only is it a compelling drama and tragedy of "the Mafia," it is a classic part of American heritage in providing a philosophy of life. It has brought to the learned world a dark, Machiavellian and poetic lifestyle, which has influenced generation after generation. For those of you who have not yet experienced The Godfather, it is an epic about Don Vito Corleone, the most brilliant man to have graced written page and silver screen. Born Vito Andolini, the Godfather was forced out of Corleone, Italy, as a little boy, after a death sentence was put on him by the local Mafia. He fled to America, starting an olive oil company that grew into an entire syndicate of importing, gambling, prostitution and political influence. He was a man who realized that he himself could provide a greater service the people around him than any form of government - and through this realization came the formation of a Mafia, a collective group of employees whose purpose was to gain profits and to aid those within this brotherhood. His family, or organization, rose to the top of the underworld and achieved a magnificent reign of power.


Semifinals up next for W. Soccer

October 25, 2001

After two convincing victories last week over Western Maryland and Bryn Mawr for the Women's Soccer team, the Lady Jays were pitted against stiffer competition, in that of Mary Washington College. In the non-Conference game, Hopkins just could not get anything started offensively, resulting in a 0-0 draw. In the final game of the season, the Blue Jays only needed to tie Franklin and Marshall to secure a playoff spot.


The powers that be - A Necessary Ambiguity

October 25, 2001

We have many different kinds of people here at Hopkins. Amongst these people is a diverse blend of personalities and preferences. The quiet academes holed up in the library. The boisterous Greeks that associate under their eponymous letters of organization. Amongst all these different types, there is an amorphous group whose charge of duty is to provide "a school unity and spirit."


Mafia game indulges fantasy, avoids jail term

October 25, 2001

For many of us, the word "Mafia" does not conjure up images of large serious men in dark suits, waiting to be introduced as "my associates." No greasy backroom deals are considered; the melancholy strains of The Godfather theme fail to play in the background. Instead we think of the popular group game, Mafia, used as a mixer when trying to introduce large groups of people to each other.


Neuron, fat cell interaction may provide key to obesity

October 25, 2001

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University, in a recent study, have demonstrated the ability of fat cells to participate in a form of two-way communication with nerve cells outside the brain. This study provides the first definitive research that fat cells can directly influence the action of neurons not located within the brain. This has important consequences on research aimed at understanding the storage and burning of fat, obesity and diseases like diabetes.


Contemporary gems from Boulez, a genius of music

October 25, 2001

It is hard to imagine the post-war classical music world without Pierre Boulez. Boulez the composer is a radical exponent of integral composition in the dodecaphonic language of serialism. Boulez the conductor shuns the mantle of interpreter in favor of urtext-caliber precision. Boulez the critic has little time for those who are not advancing the musical art. Whatever his role, Boulez is equally uncompromising.