news-features


Online registration system unveiled

November 1, 2001

Six years ago, the Hopkins community began asking for an online registration system. Since then, rumors have circulated every semester about a trial period being just around the corner. Now as we approach 2002, we are finally being given an "interim ...


Students assemble at MSE to reflect on war

November 1, 2001

Johns Hopkins University students gathered on the lawn outside MSE Library on Wednesday for "A Time of Reflection" to discuss the repercussions of the war in Afghanistan and the tragedies of Sept. 11. The forum, sponsored by JHU for Peace, focused on opposition to U.S. policy regarding the war against the terrorism. Among the topics discussed were the effects of U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East, the role of the military and the humanitarian crisis in Afghanistan. The forum also addressed the issue of censorship in America. The purpose of the discussion, cited in an informational bulletin, was to "generate thought and dialogue about the situation."


Student Council swears in Class of 2005 members

November 1, 2001

The Student Council swore in its new freshman officers at their meeting this Tuesday. Class of 2005 members President Ben Radel, Vice President Megan Coe, Secretary/Treasurer Shannon Chang and Representatives Charles Reyner, Morgan MacDonald and Manu Sharma took their oath of office in front of the older student council members present.


Security responds to FBI's warning

November 1, 2001

Johns Hopkins University Security responded to this week's Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) warning of possible terrorist attacks by reemphasizing current heightened alert procedures and instructing staff to pay particular attention to all trucks on campus premises. The FBI alert, issued on Monday, warns of a credible threat that suggests possible terrorist attacks on the United States, home or abroad, over the next week.


Amnesty International has debate

November 1, 2001

On Wednesday, the Johns Hopkins Amnesty International organization hosted T. Kumar, the Amnesty International Advocacy Director for Asia and the Pacific. Kumar has served as the human rights monitor in Bosnia, Haiti, Guatemala and South Africa and as the United Nations representative for Peace Brigades International. He was also imprisoned for five years and tortured in Sri Lanka for his human rights advocacy and Amnesty International adopted him as a "prisoner of conscience."


Detailing the Islamic religion

November 1, 2001

After the tragic events of Sept. 11, Osama bin Laden and other Islamic extremists have typified the average Muslim to the American public's perception. But in actuality, most Muslims condemn bin Laden and the Taliban as contrary to Islamic teaching. With fully one fifth of the world professed Muslims, it is important to break beyond fearful stereotypes and understand the basic tenets of Islam.


Field Hockey ends year in controversy

November 1, 2001

The Johns Hopkins Field Hockey team took part in the Centennial Conference Tournament this past weekend on Saturday and Sunday. The winner of the tournament earns a bid to the NCAA tournament, and the Blue Jays were hopeful to take advantage of this opportunity.


M. Soccer closes out year at 15-2

November 1, 2001

Closing out the regular season in winning form, the Men's Soccer team defeated two Conference rivals last week by beating Gettysburg 2-0 on Wednesday and Franklin & Marshall 3-2 on Saturday. With the wins, the Blue Jays finished the season with an overall record of 15-2 while going 9-0 against Centennial Conference foes. Remaining unbeaten in the conference, the Jays secured home field advantage for the Conference tournament to be held Nov. 2-3.


JHUMA hosts Islam Awareness Week

November 1, 2001

The JHU Muslim Association (JHUMA) is currently hosting its annual Islam Awareness Week for students to broaden their understanding of Islam and to promote knowledge of the student interfaith group. The events scheduled for Monday through Saturday of this week included a series of lectures, a documentary showing and a closing banquet.


Terrorist units: Bin Laden v. Hamas

November 1, 2001

In this age of nuclear weapons and the Internet, the biggest threat the U.S. now faces is terrorism. This is not the threat of North Korea sending inter-continental ballistic missiles into the middle of Washington, D.C. This is a guy with a bomb blowing himself up under a building. This is a handful of well-organized and well-funded middle class men crashing airplanes into symbols of American prosperity and power.


Missed Halloween? Here are some ideas for what to do this weekend

November 1, 2001

Ahh, Oct. 31. How I love the smell of face paint in the evening. The sight of whirling dervishes of dead brown leaves swirling in the wind under a big cloudy sky. The taste of the sugary traces of candy still left on my lips. The feel of cobblestones under my feet at Fell's Point. The smell of drunken strangers' breath in my face - demanding to know what my costume is. Okay, not so much the drunken strangers one. But it is an indisputable characteristic of Halloween in college and especially so in college in Baltimore where no holiday is complete without a drunken wino/ student getting in your face. Lord knows you can't go trick-or-treating in the ghetto. No amount of safe trick-or-treating precautions from the local police could ever make that a good idea. And of course Fell's Point, a distinctive Baltimore Halloween tradition, is the one and only place to go to see the local color and get that old community-feeling back.


Voice recognition technology used to record Holocaust victims' stories

November 1, 2001

In 1994, filmmaker Steven Spielberg established the Shoah Visual History Foundation, a center dedicated to videotaping and saving the testimonies of Holocaust survivors and witnesses. Since its inception, the Shoah Foundation has amassed over 116,000 hours of digitized Holocaust testimonies from over 52,000 interviews in 32 different languages.


Hopkins ROTC teaches discipline and teamwork - Students join the Army ROTC for many reasons, all learn ethics

November 1, 2001

You may have seen students around campus dressed in camouflage uniforms, or maybe you've seen ROTC information tables around the Wolman lobby while heading into lunch. In a myriad of different ways, the Johns Hopkins ROTC is a strong presence on campus. But for students who aren't involved in ROTC themselves, many questions remain. What do people do in ROTC? Is it like being in the army? And why do people join ROTC in the first place?