Published by the Students of Johns Hopkins since 1896
December 9, 2022

Arts & Entertainment



COURTESY OF JOHN D’CRUZ
The Banshees of Inisherin, The Boys from Biloxi and Crybaby are a few of the picks to explore this fall break.

To watch and watch for: week of Oct. 16

Believe it or not, fall break is upon us — though only after we’ve finished three more days of classes. But then we’ll all finally have a moment to breathe, sleep and really sleep. Thankfully it’s an exciting week for releases across the board, especially with a much-anticipated album from a certain singer-songwriter who needs no introduction.


NASA HQ PHOTO / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
Michael Giacchino, a famed American composer, makes his directorial debut with Werewolf by Night.

Marvel’s Werewolf by Night is a frightfully fun old-school monster tale

Marvel Studios’ Werewolf by Night is a television special that was released on Disney+ on Oct. 7, and is a single-episode story about what happens when a group of monster hunters are gathered together to compete for the ownership of the magical “Bloodstone” after its previous owner passes away. However, one of the monster hunters is not who they say they are.


RED CARPET REPORT ON MINGLE MEDIA TV / CC BY-SA 2.0
Along with Bette Midler and Sarah Jessica Parker, Kathy Najimy reprises her role as one of the Sanderson Sisters in Hocus Pocus 2.

Hocus Pocus 2: A nostalgic mess

With Halloween just a few weeks away, if you’re like me, you’re likely on the lookout for a festive, spooky film to snuggle up and watch over a bowl of candy corn. Luckily, this October has been filled with new horror films, from Halloween Ends, the last in the Halloween trilogy, to Prey for the Devil coming out on Oct. 28. However, as someone who enjoys a milder scare, I was beyond ecstatic when I heard Disney+ was releasing a sequel to the 1993 cult classic Hocus Pocus on Sept. 30.


COURTESY OF JINGYAN ZHANG
This year's Hoptoberfest concert was headlined by Desiigner, a rapper.

Rapper Desiigner electrifies crowd at Hoptoberfest

The week-long festivities of Hoptoberfest 2022 concluded on Oct. 8, with an exhilarating performance from Brooklyn-born rapper Desiigner at Shriver Hall. Known by his stage name Desiigner, Sidney Royel Selby III is perhaps best known amongst the Gen Z undergraduate student body for his hit debut single “Panda,” which premiered in December 2015.




COURTESY OF MARY KATE MCCORMICK
This week’s picks include Heat, Blue Rev and As the Moon Rests.

To watch and watch for: week of Oct. 9

As the semester gets crazier and crazier with each passing day, the need for some escapism gets more intense. Taking note of that, the world of arts has once again stepped up to the occasion to help us Blue Jays out! 


LENKE SZILÁGYI / CC BY-SA 3.0
Hungarian novelist and screenwriter László Krasznahorkai penned Spadework for a Palace.

“Reality is no obstacle”: a review of László Krasznahorkai’s Spadework for a Palace

It’s hard to know what to make of the newest effort by László Krasznahorkai, Spadework for a Palace. The novella concerns an aging librarian at the New York Public Library named herman melvill. He is overtaken by an obsessive interest in three artists who also lived and worked in Manhattan: the writers Herman Melville and Malcolm Lowry and the architect Lebbeus Woods.



COURTESY OF MARY KATE MCCORMICK
Amsterdam, Our Missing Hearts and Charlie are a few of the most anticipated picks this week.

To watch and watch for: week of Oct. 2

With the first round of midterms seemingly sneaking up already, it’s certainly around the time when we’re all pressed for time. But, in a little twist of counterintuition, this week might actually be perfect to squeeze in a trip to the theater, read the first chapter of a book or switch up your playlist.


WORLD INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY ORGANIZATION / CC-BY-NC-ND 2.0
Maggie Cheung is the lead actress of Wong Kar Wai’s 2000 romance drama In the Mood for Love.

In focus: In the Mood for Love (2000)

I distinctly remember the suffocating depression I fell into the weekend I went to see Wong Kar-wai’s In the Mood for Love at the Charles Theater last semester. There, in the company of an auditorium full of strangers, I watched a profound tragedy that haunts me to this day. 


GAGE SKIDMORE / CC BY-SA 2.0
Florence Pugh is one of the stars of Olivia Wilde's new film Don't Worry Darling.

Don’t Worry Darling is actually not that bad?

Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the last few months, odds are you’ve heard at least something about Olivia Wilde’s latest film Don’t Worry Darling, starring Florence Pugh and Harry Styles. Most likely, you’ve read headlines about casting feuds, on-set affairs or spitting accusations and concluded, unlike Styles in his viral interview, that this movie feels anything but like an actual movie. 


GAGE SKIDMORE / CC BY-SA 2.0
Steven Spielberg’s ET: The Extra Terrestrial returns to the Senator Theatre as this week’s revival screening.

To watch and watch for: week of Sept. 25

It’s another exciting week for the arts! From movies to books, there are tons of promising new entries for people looking to indulge themselves in something original, while some old classics also return briefly to the scene, like James Cameron’s Avatar and Steven Spielberg’s ET: The Extra Terrestrial. 


GAGE SKIDMORE / CC BY-SA 3.0
Camila Mendes stars as a tortured queen bee in Netflix’s Do Revenge.

Do Revenge is a fun high school drama that suffers from mixed messaging

Do Revenge, released on Netflix on Sept. 16., follows two girls who attend a prestigious prep school, Drea (Camila Mendes) and Eleanor (Maya Hawke), as they execute revenge plots on the students who’ve wronged them. Without going into spoilers, the movie has many twists and turns that made it fun to watch. It might even be worth watching it a second time to pick up on any hidden details that I missed the first time through.


JAMIE CURIO / CC BY-NC 2.0
Moonage Daydream, one of the picks of this week, documents the enigmatic life of David Bowie.

To watch and watch for: week of Sept. 18

As the parade of tent pole summer blockbusters leave the cinema, the throes of September are known to offer slim pickings when it comes to arts and entertainment. But who’s to say this is bad news? Instead, I find it can double as a fruitful time to try something new.



BOLLYWOOD HUNGAMA / CC BY 3.0
Alia Bhatt is one of the stars of the innovative but lazily written Brahmastra: Part One — Shiva.

Brahmāstra feels like a crayon-drawn script mistakenly taken seriously by producers

After years of Indian audiences imploring Bollywood to depart from its monotonous formulaic productions, the industry has boldly answered the calls with Brahmāstra: Part One – Shiva. It’s by no means a perfect movie, and it fails to avoid many of the common pitfalls that contemporary Bollywood movies fall into, like clunky dialogue and awkwardly-paced plots. However, in the grand scheme of things, Brahmāstra breaks new ground by ushering the industry into the 21st century with its visual effects and introduction of the Astraverse, perhaps the first planned cinematic universe and trilogy in Bollywood.




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