Published by the Students of Johns Hopkins since 1896
August 1, 2021

Arts & Entertainment



COURTESY OF SARAH JUNG
Dance at Le moulin de la Galette was one of his many works presented during his birthday livestream event.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir’s 180th birthday celebrated through livestream

On Feb. 25 I celebrated one of my favorite artist’s birthdays at the “Pierre-Auguste Renoir 180th Birthday — Livestream Art Program” hosted by Robert Kelleman, founder and director of non-profit organization Washington, D.C. History & Culture. As a participant of the virtual art gallery tour, I was fondly reminded of my previous tourist experiences in art galleries. 


EVA RINALDI/CC BY-SA 2.0
Jason Sudeikis accepted his award for Best Actor in a Musical or Comedy TV Series while wearing a sweatshirt.

78th Golden Globes, though heartfelt and amusing, loses magic to online format

The 78th Golden Globe Awards kicked off the 2021 film and TV awards season on Sunday. As expected, it was a mostly virtual ceremony, with nominees tuning in through Zoom and presenters showing up in-person at their respective bicoastal locations. Hosts Tina Fey and Amy Poehler returned, and with already three hosting turns already under their belts, it promised to be an eventful, no-holds-barred kind of night. 



COURTESY OF SARAH JUNG
Daniil Trifonov showed off his musical talent to Hopkins students in a virtual recital. 

Shriver Hall Concert Series hosts Daniil Trifonov's virtual concert

This past Sunday, the Shriver Hall Concert Series livestreamed Daniil Trifonov’s pre-recorded piano program from New York's 92nd Street Y. The virtually delivered event was a success, with over 200 live attendees from around the world — highlighting Trifonov’s international presence.



EDWARD BURTYNSKY/CC BY 2.0
Burtynsky’s photographs highlight the effect of industry on nature, one of the themes of the show.

Photography workshop highlights relations between laborers, factories and media

The History of Art and East Asian Studies departments sponsored an event titled “Documenting Industry: Photography, Modernity and the Nation in India and China” on Feb. 19. Scholars from around the world joined the Zoom-recorded event, presenting original research on ways in which documentary photographers have explored the lives of industrial laborers in India and China. 




PICASA/CC BY 3.0
To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before takes on Netflix’s Top 10 as fans finally get to watch the long-awaited finale. 

Imperfections aside, To All the Boys: Always and Forever is a heartwarming finale

The teen romance trilogy that started with a bang is now coming to a long-awaited end. To All the Boys: Always and Forever marks the last time we’ll see the much-beloved on-screen couple, though it won’t necessarily mark the end of their love story. This time, Lara Jean Covey (Lana Condor) and Peter Kavinsky (Noah Centineo) face the ups and downs of senior year of high school, coupled with the stress of the uncharted territory that awaits them after graduation.


COURTESY OF JHU BARNSTORMERS
A still from the Barnstormers’ production of Clue: Stay at Home.

Clue: Stay at Home is a Zoom success

The Barnstormers return to our home-theaters once again with the warmth of easy-going comedy and the intrigue of a classic “whodunnit” narrative in their special Clue: Stay at Home. The production was a livestreamed virtual adaptation of Clue, a screenplay inspired by the timeless Hasbro board game and iconic film of the same name.


You Will Die at 20 is visually and emotionally breathtaking

Over the last 11 months, I’ve found it increasingly hard to sit through a movie in one sitting or even to coax myself into viewing a film at all, really. Since I’m on my computer all the time, seated in one place for classes and work, sitting down to watch something online for a couple of hours has become incredibly unappealing.



COURTESY OF REBECCA PENNER
“How To Care For Strangers” displays a unique bond between friends as they explore fantasy worlds. 

Hopkins student and alum's "How To Care For Strangers" wins best in category at FLiFF

Set to officially premiere in 2021, Hopkins senior Rebecca Penner and ‘20 alum Carver Bain won Best College Long Narrative at the 2020 Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival (FLiFF) with their film “How To Care For Strangers.” With Penner’s skills as a Film & Media Studies major and Bain’s insight as both a Film & Media Studies and Theatre Arts & Studies minor, the pair was able to combine forces to co-write this energetic film.


JALISSA GRAY/CC BY-SA 3.0
Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Natasha Trethewey spoke virtually at Hopkins.

Natasha Trethewey explores the power of poetic metaphor

The Hopkins Writing Seminars Department hosted a Turnbull Poetry Lecture by Natasha Trethewey, the 19th poet laureate of the U.S. and winner of the 2007 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry, on Feb. 4. So far, she has written five books of poetry, including Domestic Work, her astounding debut which was selected for the Cave Canem Poetry Prize. The lecture was open to the public and accessible through Zoom. 


TRAVIS WISE/CC BY 2.0
In a year of new virtual adventures, the Sundance Film Festival did not disappoint. 

Virtual Sundance Film Festival sets a new precedent

With awards season postponed and few major film releases, it’s been an unusually dull time for us film geeks. Thankfully, film festivals are still a go, albeit online and with limited in-person capacities. One of them is the prestigious Sundance Film Festival, which kicked off on Jan. 28 and took place over seven days. Leaving behind its Park City venue of four decades, Sundance turned to a mostly virtual modality to deliver its screenings, talks and events. 


COURTESY OF CHRIS H. PARK
This year’s annual ceremony was live-streamed in order to reduce in-person gatherings. 

Lighting of the Quads, though a little different this year, is still successful

Hopkins hosted its annual Lighting of the Quads (LOTQ) celebration on YouTube Live this past Saturday. LOTQ usually takes place each December shortly before finals; however, this year’s celebration marked many firsts — the first time the event went virtual, the first time it took place during the spring semester and the first time there was no live audience in the ordinary sense. 


BOLLYWOOD HUNGAMA/CC BY 3.0
Priyanka Chopra Jonas stars in the film adaptation of The White Tiger.

The White Tiger tackles class struggle in the era of globalization

The White Tiger movie debuted this January after long-delayed plans for movie production, and is one of the largest international releases of an Indian movie in recent years. It’s not hard to guess why: Despite its source material being over a decade old, it presents a story of class warfare, global inequality and crises of democracy that have become even more relevant today. 



GEORGE GRIE / CC BY-SA 4.0
The ending scene of Dostoevsky’s novel is telling of unrelenting social dilemma today.

Raskolnikov’s final dream in Crime and Punishment is a prophecy of 2021

In the epilogue of a new translation of Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment, Raskolnikov’s hysterical condition worsens upon beginning his prison sentence, causing him to have a feverish dream about the spread of nihilism in the form of a virus. The events chronicled in this dream are extremely telling of dual pandemics — the global COVID-19 outbreak and the dissemination of disinformation through social media — that plagued 2020 and now plague 2021.


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